* Blog


* Últimos mensajes


* Temas mas recientes

PPCC-Pisitófilos Creditófagos-Otoño 2021 por Derby
[Hoy a las 22:12:53]


PODEMOS (Pues no... así no vais a poder) por wanderer
[Ayer a las 12:19:36]


Coches electricos por Cadavre Exquis
[Octubre 22, 2021, 21:33:14 pm]


STEM por pollo
[Octubre 19, 2021, 12:05:27 pm]


Transición hacia una Internet censurada. Y mientras, en el cortijo... por Saturio
[Octubre 17, 2021, 20:03:24 pm]


Autor Tema: PPCC-Pisitófilos Creditófagos-Otoño 2021  (Leído 46513 veces)

8 Usuarios y 22 Visitantes están viendo este tema.

Derby

  • Sabe de economía
  • *****
  • Gracias
  • -Dadas: 12414
  • -Recibidas: 56725
  • Mensajes: 6552
  • Nivel: 658
  • Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.
    • Ver Perfil
“Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms — to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.”— Viktor E. Frankl
https://www.hks.harvard.edu/more/policycast/happiness-age-grievance-and-fear

Derby

  • Sabe de economía
  • *****
  • Gracias
  • -Dadas: 12414
  • -Recibidas: 56725
  • Mensajes: 6552
  • Nivel: 658
  • Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.
    • Ver Perfil
Re:PPCC-Pisitófilos Creditófagos-Otoño 2021
« Respuesta #811 en: Hoy a las 20:38:58 »
Es tendencia ahora mismo en TW... :biggrin:

“Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms — to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.”— Viktor E. Frankl
https://www.hks.harvard.edu/more/policycast/happiness-age-grievance-and-fear

Cadavre Exquis

  • Transicionista
  • ***
  • Gracias
  • -Dadas: 6045
  • -Recibidas: 4390
  • Mensajes: 503
  • Nivel: 60
  • Cadavre Exquis Su opinión tiene cierto peso.Cadavre Exquis Su opinión tiene cierto peso.Cadavre Exquis Su opinión tiene cierto peso.Cadavre Exquis Su opinión tiene cierto peso.Cadavre Exquis Su opinión tiene cierto peso.Cadavre Exquis Su opinión tiene cierto peso.
    • Ver Perfil
Re:PPCC-Pisitófilos Creditófagos-Otoño 2021
« Respuesta #812 en: Hoy a las 20:41:44 »

Citar
Mathieu Lehanneur designs 3D-printed sculptures based on population statistics
Alice Finney | 19 October 2021

State of the World exhibited at Design Miami/Basel

French artist Mathieu Lehanneur has used population data from 140 countries to create a collection of 3D-printed aluminium sculptures.

Called State of the World, the sculptures were presented at an exhibition at Design Miami/Basel.

The sculptures are based on population data

Each solid sculpture represents one individual country. The country's birthrate, life expectancy and history are reflected in the shape of the sculpture, with each individual groove representing an age from 1-100.

At the base is newborn children, while the peak represents the elderly. Most of the sculptures are bottom-heavy, demonstrating how few people in society live to be 100 years old.

Lehanneur sourced the data from a UN database

"The idea was to make visible and to also understand all the people who are living right now on the same planet," Lehanneur told Dezeen.

"I wanted to change the two-dimensional statistics into a three-dimensional object – like a spinning object," he said. "You can see that every single silhouette is different from one another."

Each groove represents an age from 1-100

Lehanneur retrieved the population data from a United Nations (UN) database, where it was originally depicted in mathematical graphs.

In order to accurately represent each age demographic to the half millimetre, he 3D-printed the sculptures from aluminium.

"I decided to use the aluminium because when you mash it in carefully, you can absolutely respect every single dimension," he said.

"For me, it makes sense to be extremely precise because every single millimetre means thousands of years."

Lehanneur also created a silver sculpture that represents the population data for all of Earth, which is much wider at its base than its top, showing how young the majority of the planet's population is.

A single silver sculpture represents data from the entire planet

State of the World is the continuation of an earlier series of sculptures by the designer, called The Age of the World, created in 2009.

That project, a collection of ceramic urns, represented the ages of the population in France, the USA, Japan, Egypt and Russia.


Although he started the project a decade ago, Lehanneur believes that 2021 was the right year to finalise and exhibit State of the World because of the coronavirus pandemic.

"This is a turning point in the history of humanity," he reflected. "It's super rare that the entire world basically lived the same catastrophe."

"This moment of the reopening of the world was the right moment," he added.

Lehanneur is known for artwork that explores the relationship between the living world and objects, such as a black marble table that looks like the sea.

The artist also created a range of black marble furniture sculptures that mimic waves in the ocean.




Saludos.

Derby

  • Sabe de economía
  • *****
  • Gracias
  • -Dadas: 12414
  • -Recibidas: 56725
  • Mensajes: 6552
  • Nivel: 658
  • Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.
    • Ver Perfil
Re:PPCC-Pisitófilos Creditófagos-Otoño 2021
« Respuesta #813 en: Hoy a las 20:45:44 »
https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2021/oct/24/80-of-uk-employers-plan-to-hire-over-next-12-months-survey-says

Citar
80% of UK employers plan to hire over next 12 months, survey says

Brexit and Covid-19 causing acute shortages of workers in sectors from haulage to hospitality
“Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms — to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.”— Viktor E. Frankl
https://www.hks.harvard.edu/more/policycast/happiness-age-grievance-and-fear

Derby

  • Sabe de economía
  • *****
  • Gracias
  • -Dadas: 12414
  • -Recibidas: 56725
  • Mensajes: 6552
  • Nivel: 658
  • Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.
    • Ver Perfil
Re:PPCC-Pisitófilos Creditófagos-Otoño 2021
« Respuesta #814 en: Hoy a las 21:01:44 »
https://www.globaltimes.cn/page/202110/1237180.shtml

Citar
China to overhaul housing market

Pilot property tax plan to curb speculation, systemic risks, experts say

China's decision to pilot five-year property tax levies in selected cities on Saturday drew wide attention and discussion, including reportedly resistance hyped up by some Western media outlets. However, Chinese experts said on Sunday that the new move will help ensure stable growth of China's economy and real estate market in the long run, as the country seeks to curb housing speculation, distribute wealth more evenly and pursue common prosperity for all, dismissing claims that a housing market collapse is looming.

The pilot program, one of the most profound changes to China's real estate market after decades of reshaping, is neither a signal of a crackdown on the country's housing market nor an obstacle to its economic growth, experts said. Instead, it is for the purpose of guiding rational consumption of housing and economical use of land resources to promote the steady and sound development of China's real estate market.

The Standing Committee of the National People's Congress (NPC), China's top legislature, adopted the decision on Saturday to authorize the State Council, China's cabinet, to pilot property tax reforms in some regions, according to a report by the Xinhua News Agency. The pilot program will run for five years, and the governments of the pilot areas will come up with detailed implementation rules, said the report. 

How to make the property tax acceptable to middle-class families in China and make them feel the positive impacts as soon as possible is the key to the success of the pilot program  :roto2:, but housing prices will never plunge in China as the country would not allow the introduction of a property tax reform possibly leading to the collapse of its real estate market, experts said.

The property tax in the pilot areas will be levied on all types of real estate, including residential and non-residential properties, excluding legally owned rural houses.

Previous property tax pilot programs only applied to houses, but the latest one will cover state-owned land for construction purposes, Yan Yuejin, research director at Shanghai-based E-house China R&D Institute, told the Global Times on Sunday.

The wealthy province of Zhejiang in East China, tech hub Shenzhen in South China's Guangdong Province and the southern island province of Hainan which is developing free trade businesses are expected to join the pilot program, Yan predicted.

"Zhejiang is very likely to be included in the program as the province is aiming to building itself into a pilot zone for common prosperity by 2025, so it would have good foundation and demonstration effect to be included in the trial," he said.

The property-tax rate may vary depending on region and the size of properties, and the pilot regions may come from different parts of China with different development levels, experts predicted.

Systematic experience must be gained within five years to support legislation for a nationwide property tax, Jia Kang, director of China Academy of New Supply-side Economics, told the Global Times on Sunday.

Since 2011, the Chinese central government has explored levying taxes on high-end private residential properties in Shanghai and Chongqing, two mega metropolises. Since then there has been much discussion of expanding the tests nationwide, though little progress has been announced to date, as many local governments are reluctant to push such a tax out of worries that the property taxation will cause property values to drop, and dampen market demand for land - a crucial source of local government revenues. 

"The upcoming pilot program, with a clear timeline, is a mid-to-long-term arrangement, showing a proactive and prudent attitude taken by the central government on real estate reform," Jia said.(...)

https://www.reuters.com/business/finance/china-says-will-roll-out-property-tax-pilot-scheme-some-regions-xinhua-2021-10-23/
« última modificación: Hoy a las 21:16:57 por Derby »
“Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms — to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.”— Viktor E. Frankl
https://www.hks.harvard.edu/more/policycast/happiness-age-grievance-and-fear

panoli

  • Transicionista
  • ***
  • Gracias
  • -Dadas: 6915
  • -Recibidas: 6270
  • Mensajes: 647
  • Nivel: 80
  • panoli Su opinión importapanoli Su opinión importapanoli Su opinión importapanoli Su opinión importapanoli Su opinión importapanoli Su opinión importapanoli Su opinión importapanoli Su opinión importa
    • Ver Perfil
Re:PPCC-Pisitófilos Creditófagos-Otoño 2021
« Respuesta #815 en: Hoy a las 21:36:58 »
https://blogs.elconfidencial.com/cultura/el-erizo-y-el-zorro/2021-10-12/pandemia-crisis-energia_3304809/

Citar
No, después de la pandemia no vendrán los felices años 20 sino los oscuros 70
Los datos señalan que estamos más cerca de volver a la década de la inflación, altos precios de la energía y enorme desempleo

Por Ramón González Férriz

Llevamos más de año y medio preguntándonos cómo nos comportaríamos cuando la pandemia terminase o, al menos, se volviera un fenómeno manejable. Muchos hemos especulado con que era posible que repitiéramos la actitud que se adoptó hace justo un siglo, en la década de 1920, tras el fin de la Primera Guerra Mundial y la remisión de la gran epidemia de gripe. Hartos de sacrificios, y con la economía en pleno crecimiento, nos volveríamos más hedonistas, estaríamos más dispuestos a divertirnos y derrochar porque la muerte estaría más presente que nunca, y la cultura se convertiría en una celebración un poco temeraria de seguir vivos y poder festejarlo juntos. Esa teoría siempre ha tenido puntos flacos. Pero ahora, que se acerca el final de la pandemia, puede que se haya tratado de un completo error de juicio. No parece que estemos tan dispuestos a celebrar que estamos vivos porque, aparentemente, nuestra existencia podría complicarse aún más. ¿Y si la época que vamos a repetir no fuera la década iniciada hace un siglo sino más bien la que empezó hace justo 50 años, la de 1970? En algunos aspectos de la economía, la política y la cultura, no es disparatado pensarlo. ¿Y si la época que vamos a repetir no fuera la década iniciada hace un siglo sino más bien la que empezó hace justo 50 años, la de 1970? En buena parte de Occidente, esa década supuso un susto tras otro. Y algunos de ellos son parecidos a los que tenemos hoy. Fueron los años de la gran inflación: los precios no dejaban de subir y los políticos, en su intento por contenerlos, no hicieron más que meter la pata y provocar subidas aún mayores. Por ejemplo, se pusieron controles gubernamentales a los precios (¿les suena?) o, en el caso de Estados Unidos, el presidente Gerald Ford lanzó la campaña WIN (whip inflation now, algo así como 'derrotemos ahora a la inflación'), en la que con chapas, camisetas y pegatinas se animaba a la población a controlar el consumo de combustible, ahorrar en calefacción e incluso plantar sus propias verduras en el jardín. Ford, por supuesto, perdió las elecciones.
placeholderLa crisis del petróleo de 1973.
La crisis del petróleo de 1973.
La inflación se debía, en parte, al precio disparado de la energía (esto también les sonará), provocado en este caso por un problema geopolítico: las naciones productoras de petróleo, lideradas por Arabia Saudí, decidieron boicotear a los países ricos que apoyaron a Israel en la guerra de Yom Kipur, como Japón, Reino Unido y Estados Unidos: cuando Ford entró en pánico, el precio del petróleo se había multiplicado por tres. En Reino Unido, estos fenómenos provocaron una importante escasez de alimentos y otros productos (como sucede ahora, tras el Brexit y la pandemia), un enorme desempleo y el llamado 'invierno del descontento', con huelgas terribles para exigir aumentos de sueldo que igualaran el ritmo de la subida de los precios (actualmente, de momento, el Gobierno español ya se los ha concedido a los jubilados y a los funcionarios; ya veremos si los sindicatos prepararán actos reivindicativos para obtener lo mismo de los empresarios). A mediados de los años 70, en España, el impacto de la inflación y la crisis del petróleo dificultaron aún más la Transición; pero, incluso después, el PSOE tuvo que gestionar sus consecuencias durante casi una década. La década de los 70 significó un giro a la derecha en la política
Giro a la derecha
Pero el PSOE fue más bien una excepción: en realidad, en muchos países la década de los 70 significó un giro a la derecha en la política. Al final de los 70, en parte por el cansancio de la población tras una década de graves problemas económicos, ganaron las elecciones Ronald Reagan y Margaret Thatcher (hoy en día, si hay inflación, y después del enorme gasto de los fondos europeos, con la deuda que conllevarán, no sería extraño que se produjera un parecido giro hacia la derecha, si es que no se está produciendo ya). Es llamativo que en esa década llena de sobresaltos también se produjera un giro conservador en la religión: Juan Pablo II se puso al frente de la Iglesia católica y el ayatolá Jomeini al frente del Irán posrevolucionario. Hoy, una parte notable del cristianismo occidental se está rearmando para dar la batalla moral y cultural, porque tiene la sensación, como la tenía en los 60, de que el ateísmo y el progresismo moral están triunfando sin freno.
placeholderMargaret Thatcher en 1989. (Reuters)
Margaret Thatcher en 1989. (Reuters)
 También en la década de 1970 el ecologismo pasó de ser considerado una moda 'hippie' a tenerse en cuenta como una corriente ideológica relevante: fue entonces cuando se publicaron libros cruciales para el movimiento como 'The Last Whole Earth Catalogue', que consideraba la lucha ecologista como la culminación de la lucha por los derechos civiles, o 'Diet for a Small Planet', que defendía la dieta vegetariana. En ese momento se crearon los grupos que luego darían pie al partido de los Verdes en Alemania. Entonces, los ecologistas aún eran vistos como una mezcla de románticos, chiflados y anticapitalistas. Es probable que hoy no pase lo mismo, pero quizá sigamos sin tomarnos en serio la magnitud del problema ecológico. En los 70 ya se sabía que el sueño 'hippie' había muerto y el novelista Tom Wolfe declaró que fue la 'década del yo' Pero no fueron solo la economía y la política. Fue también la cultura. En los 70 ya se sabía que el sueño 'hippie' había muerto y el novelista Tom Wolfe declaró que fue la 'década del yo': la gente se había cansado del comunitarismo, de las luchas idealistas y de los sacrificios de la acción política y se dedicó, básicamente, a mirarse al ombligo (después de una década de cultura woke e hipermovilización izquierdista, pienso que sucederá lo mismo). La cultura lo reflejó: los Sex Pistols no reivindicaban un mundo mejor, sino divertirse mientras este ardía; David Bowie se enfrascó en un viaje espacial alucinógeno e individualista que acabó siendo un panegírico de los placeres consumistas y capitalistas y, bueno, nació el 'heavy metal': una música dura y oscura en la que las clases obreras británicas ensalzaban las virtudes malignas de Satanás. Stephen King publicó algunas de las novelas de terror más espeluznantes —'Carrie' o 'El resplandor'— y el género de la autoayuda alcanzó la madurez con megaéxitos como 'Juan Sebastián Gaviota' y 'El zen y el arte del mantenimiento de la motocicleta'. ¿Cuántas malas noticias podremos aguantar antes de optar por el nihilismo, el hiperconsumo (mientras podamos), el satanismo o, a la vez, la autoayuda?
placeholderLos Sex Pistols a finales de los 70.
Los Sex Pistols a finales de los 70.
Sigo pensando que puede haber buenas noticias que hagan que nuestros años 20 se parezcan bastante a los de hace un siglo. De hecho, la mayoría de expertos afirman que las malas noticias económicas que tenemos ahora son pasajeras. Pero deberíamos estar alerta: tal vez, aunque salgamos a bailar, esta acabe siendo una década tan sombría y loca como la de 'Fiebre del sábado noche', una de las películas que mejor reflejan el lado funesto de los años 70 y con la que quizá pronto nos sintamos identificados.

Derby

  • Sabe de economía
  • *****
  • Gracias
  • -Dadas: 12414
  • -Recibidas: 56725
  • Mensajes: 6552
  • Nivel: 658
  • Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.
    • Ver Perfil
Re:PPCC-Pisitófilos Creditófagos-Otoño 2021
« Respuesta #816 en: Hoy a las 22:12:53 »
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2021/10/24/energy-housing-policy-missing/

Citar
Tories’ housing failure will usher in a nasty era of extremism

The crippling gap between the haves and have-nots is now a source of simmering political resentment that will cost the Conservatives dearly

“Great book!” So said Michael Gove as he walked purposefully walked past the GB News broadcasting stand at the Conservative party conference.

“Did you read the whole thing?” I quickly responded, as the new Levelling Up, Housing and Communities Secretary came into, then out of, earshot. “I certainly did,” he replied.

Last year I wrote Home Truths: The UK’s chronic housing shortage. While hardly troubling the bestseller list, the book has been widely read by MPs, civil servants and other policymakers, as well as across the building industry.

Home Truths explains why, since the 1960s, the UK has built around 3m too few homes. This has seen property prices spiral way ahead of earnings.

That’s why millions of young adults are stuck in shared, rented accommodation and have put their lives on hold – with countless others denied social housing. Frustration and insecurity abound as, for so many, a decent home remains out of reach.

The core argument of the book is that instead of juicing up the “demand side”, using “Help-to-Buy” or sanctioning ever more borrowing, fundamental “supply side” reforms are needed. The house building industry is dominated by a few over-mighty firms – which is why Home Truths argues a full Competition and Markets Authority inquiry is required.

Drastic changes are also needed regarding the provision of land and planning permission. Ministers have talked tough for years but failed utterly to tackle entrenched vested interests.

Over the last decade, as local councils have granted more permissions, large developers who control the industry have engineered a go-slow, making higher profits by building fewer homes.

Even Gove’s enemies would acknowledge his intelligence and definitive reformist streak – as demonstrated when he was Education Secretary. When he was put charge of housing, I thought genuine policy innovation could be in the works.



Yet, over a year after ministers promised radical planning reforms “unlike anything since the Second World War”, and despite almost 45,000 consultation responses, Gove has now halted such reforms.

Far from finally taking steps to fix our “broken housing market”, the new Communities Secretary used this month’s party conference to ditch ambitions to facilitate significantly more housebuilding.

Boris Johnson confirmed this change of tack, insisting “our green spaces will be preserved” amid reports the manifesto pledge to build 300,000 homes each year – designed to appeal to “priced out” young adults and “generation rent” – could be dropped.

No one wants to ruin areas of outstanding natural beauty – which are anyway protected.

But the “greenbelt” now covers 13pc of this country, while residential housing covers just 2pc. Far from being “concreted over”, designated greenbelt acreage has more than doubled over the last four decades. Much of this is urban scrub, ripe for development, or humdrum farmland close to major towns and cities where people want to live and work.

It is ridiculous, and a source of huge social injustice, that during the last half century, a period of fast population growth, no sizeable additional towns have been created in the UK, despite less than one-fiftieth of our landmass being used to actually house those who live here.

There are Cabinet ministers who fully understand this. Almost every senior Tory I know gets that, unless the sharp decline in home ownership is reversed, particularly among adults of child-rearing age, the Conservatives’ core vote will collapse.

Yet those steering government are, despite a huge 80-seat majority, taking the easy option of pandering to the property oligarchs, land agents and landowners, maintaining a system which generates “contrived scarcity” and keeps the price of property and residential building plots sky high.



That’s great for those who have, crippling for those who have not. The housing market, so long a source of wealth distribution and social mobility for those who work hard to weather a mortgage, is now a source of simmering social and political resentment. Unless fixed, it will ultimately create an era of nasty, extremist politics.

Some might say I’m just bitter. Yes, I’ve spent a lot of time putting together a detailed programme of housing reforms, which I thought might interest this Government. Alas, not.

Yet I see policy incoherence across numerous sectors – or at least, a determination stubbornly to ignore economic realities, lest they undermine a good headline.

Take energy policy – an area where Boris Johnson’s administration can’t be blamed for the mess we’re in but seems unwilling to acknowledge the extent of it. Having closed the Rough facility off the Yorkshire coast in 2017, the UK has a chronic dearth of gas storage, leaving us hopelessly dependent on volatile “spot markets”.

Energy-intensive companies such as steelmakers and manufacturers are especially vulnerable – a reality which ultimately threatens the viability of thousands of UK-based companies employing millions of workers.

Ahead of the Cop26 summit, the Government clings to its claim achieving “net zero” carbon emissions by 2050 will cost £50bn a year – an estimate countless credible analysts have demonstrated is a hopeless underestimate. The long-promised Treasury review of these costings remains unpublished.

And consider business rates – levied on the value of company property, payable before any revenue, let alone profit, has been made.

This is a tax which discourages investment, particularly by small and medium-sized firms, and wildly disadvantages bricks and mortar retailers struggling to keep countless British high streets alive amid competition from the online giants.

The Chancellor was due to unveil a long-awaited overhaul of this outdated tax in this week’s Budget. But reforms have apparently been “shelved” because ministers have “not had enough time”.

To these sector-specific policy misses must be added the Government’s broader failure to use post-Brexit freedoms – including state-aid, regional taxation and broader regulatory reform – to kick start the long-promised “levelling-up” agenda.

As autumn turns to winter, we’re entering a period of turbulence ­– during which the economy, while determining long-term electoral outcomes as it always does, will dominate day-to-day politics too.

Yet, at the heart of Government, there seems to be little in the way of detailed and strategic thinking about the economy, let alone economic policymaking.
“Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms — to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.”— Viktor E. Frankl
https://www.hks.harvard.edu/more/policycast/happiness-age-grievance-and-fear

 


SimplePortal 2.3.3 © 2008-2010, SimplePortal