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Autor Tema: STEM  (Leído 95696 veces)

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Cadavre Exquis

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Re:STEM
« Respuesta #390 en: Noviembre 22, 2023, 08:48:10 am »
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Giant Batteries Drain Economics of Gas Power Plants
Posted by BeauHD on Wednesday November 22, 2023 @02:00AM from the shifting-economics dept.

Batteries used to store power produced by renewables are becoming cheap enough to make developers abandon scores of projects for gas-fired generation worldwide. Reuters reports:
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The long-term economics of gas-fired plants, used in Europe and some parts of the United States primarily to compensate for the intermittent nature of wind and solar power, are changing quickly, according to Reuters' interviews with more than a dozen power plant developers, project finance bankers, analysts and consultants. They said some battery operators are already supplying back-up power to grids at a price competitive with gas power plants, meaning gas will be used less. The shift challenges assumptions about long-term gas demand and could mean natural gas has a smaller role in the energy transition than posited by the biggest, listed energy majors.

In the first half of the year, 68 gas power plant projects were put on hold or cancelled globally, according to data provided exclusively to Reuters by U.S.-based non-profit Global Energy Monitor. [...] "In the early 1990s, we were running gas plants baseload, now they are shifting to probably 40% of the time and that's going to drop off to 11%-15% in the next eight to 10 years," Keith Clarke, chief executive at Carlton Power, told Reuters. Developers can no longer use financial modelling that assumes gas power plants are used constantly throughout their 20-year-plus lifetime, analysts said. Instead, modellers need to predict how much gas generation is needed during times of peak demand and to compensate for the intermittency of renewable sources that are hard to anticipate.

The cost of lithium-ion batteries has more than halved from 2016 to 2022 to $151 per kilowatt hour of battery storage, according to BloombergNEF. At the same time, renewable generation has reached record levels. Wind and solar powered 22% of the EU's electricity last year, almost doubling their share from 2016, and surpassing the share of gas generation for the first time, according to think tank Ember's European Electricity Review. "In the early years, capacity markets were dominated by fossil fuel power stations providing the flexible electricity supply," said Simon Virley, head of energy at KPMG. Now batteries, interconnectors and consumers shifting their electricity use are also providing that flexibility, Virley added.
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Re:STEM
« Respuesta #391 en: Noviembre 28, 2023, 20:52:26 pm »
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Google's New Geothermal Energy Project is Up and Running
Posted by msmash on Tuesday November 28, 2023 @01:40PM from the making-inroads dept.

A first-of-its-kind geothermal project is now up and running in Nevada, where it will help power Google's data centers with clean energy. From a report:
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Google is partnering with startup Fervo, which has developed new technology for harnessing geothermal power. Since they're using different tactics than traditional geothermal plants, it is a relatively small project with the capacity to generate 3.5 MW. For context, one megawatt is enough to meet the demand of roughly 750 homes. The project will feed electricity into the local grid that serves two of Google's data centers outside of Las Vegas and Reno.

It's part of Google's plan to run on carbon pollution-free electricity around the clock by 2030. To reach that goal, it'll have to get more sources of clean energy online. And it sees geothermal as a key part of the future electricity mix that can fill in whenever wind and solar energy wane. "If you think about how much we advanced wind and solar and lithium ion storage, here we are -- this is kind of the next set of stuff and we feel like companies have a huge role to play in advancing these technologies," says Michael Terrell, senior director of energy and climate at Google.
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Re:STEM
« Respuesta #392 en: Diciembre 01, 2023, 07:37:49 am »
He estado dudando sobre si colgarlo en el hilo de Coches eléctricos, pero creo que encaja mejor en este...

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Hyundai and Kia's New 'Uni Wheel' Drive System Could Revolutionize EV Design
Posted by BeauHD on Thursday November 30, 2023 @09:02PM from the game-changer dept.

"Two articles from Electrek and InsideEVs describe Hyundai and Kia's new 'Uni Wheel' drive system that could revolutionize EV design," writes longtime Slashdot reader Uncle_Meataxe. From a report:
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Described by its makers as a "paradigm-shifting vehicle drive system," the Uni Wheel moves the main drive system components to the vacant space within an EVs wheel hubs. The approach utilizes a planetary gear configuration consisting of a sun gear in the center, four pinion gears on each side, and a ring gear surrounding everything. Traditional ICE vehicles utilize CV joints, but by moving them closer to the wheels requires a short drive train length and as a result, a decrease in efficiency and durability -- especially over bumpy terrain. Hyundai and Kia's Uni Wheel system on the other hand, can transmit power with almost zero changes to efficiency, regardless of wheel movement.
"Advantages include more platform space and more room within an EV's interior," adds Uncle_Meataxe. "When this system may be integrated into an actual EV remains unclear, but Kia and Hyundai have already registered eight patents related to the technology." You can learn more about the new drive system via an instructional video on YouTube.

Saludos.
« última modificación: Diciembre 01, 2023, 07:40:06 am por Cadavre Exquis »

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Re:STEM
« Respuesta #393 en: Diciembre 12, 2023, 18:04:32 pm »
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AI As Good As Doctors At Checking X-Rays
Posted by BeauHD on Tuesday December 12, 2023 @09:40AM from the future-of-medicine dept.

A new study from the University of Warwick found that artificial intelligence can analyze X-rays and diagnose medical issues better than doctors. The BBC reports:
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Software was trained using chest X-rays from more than 1.5m patients, and scanned for 37 possible conditions. It was just as accurate or more accurate than doctors' analysis at the time the image was taken for 35 out of 37 conditions, the University of Warwick said. The AI could reduce doctors' workload and delays in diagnosis, and offer radiologists the "ultimate second opinion," researchers added. The software understood that some abnormalities for which it scanned were more serious than others, and could flag the most urgent to medics, the university said.

To check the results were accurate, more than 1,400 X-rays analysed by the software were cross-examined by senior radiologists. They then compared the diagnoses made by the AI with those made by radiologists at the time. The software, called X-Raydar, removed human error and bias, said lead author, Dr Giovanni Montana, Professor of Data Science at Warwick University. "If a patient is referred for an X-ray with a heart problem, doctors will inevitably focus on the heart over the lungs," he said. "This is totally understandable but runs the risk of undetected problems in other areas".
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Re:STEM
« Respuesta #394 en: Enero 07, 2024, 20:01:51 pm »
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Flowers Are Evolving To Have Less Sex
Posted by msmash on Friday January 05, 2024 @02:20PM from the how-about-that dept.

As the number of bees and other pollinators falls, field pansies are adapting by fertilizing their own seeds, a new study found. From a report:
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Every spring, trillions of flowers mate with the help of bees and other animals. They lure the pollinators to their flowers with flashy colors and nectar. As the animals travel from flower to flower, they take pollen with them, which can fertilize the seeds of other plants. A new study suggests that humans are quickly altering this annual rite of spring. As toxic pesticides and vanishing habitats have driven down the populations of bees and other pollinators, some flowers have evolved to fertilize their own seeds more often, rather than those of other plants.

Scientists said they were surprised by the speed of the changes, which occurred in just 20 generations. "That's rapid evolution," said Pierre-Olivier Cheptou, an evolutionary ecologist at the University of Montpellier in France who led the research. Dr. Cheptou was inspired to carry out the study when it became clear that bees and other pollinators were in a drastic decline. Would flowers that depend on pollinators for sex, he wondered, find another way to reproduce? The study focused on a weedy plant called the field pansy, whose white, yellow and purple flowers are common in fields and on roadsides across Europe. Field pansies typically use bumblebees to sexually reproduce. But they can also use their own pollen to fertilize their own seeds, a process called selfing.

Selfing is more convenient than sex, since a flower does not have to wait for a bee to drop by. But a selfing flower can use only its own genes to produce new seeds. Sexual reproduction allows flowers to mix their DNA, creating new combinations that may make them better prepared for diseases, droughts and other challenges that future generations may face. To track the evolution of field pansies in recent decades, Dr. Cheptou and his colleagues took advantage of a cache of seeds that France's National Botanical Conservatories collected in the 1990s and early 2000s. The researchers compared these old flowers with new ones from across the French countryside. After growing the new and old seeds side by side in the lab under identical conditions, they discovered that selfing had increased 27 percent since the 1990s.
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Re:STEM
« Respuesta #395 en: Enero 07, 2024, 20:05:36 pm »
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World's First Partial Heart Transplant Grows Valves and Arteries
Posted by BeauHD on Thursday January 04, 2024 @10:30PM from the proof-of-concept dept.

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Interesting Engineering:
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Marking a significant advancement in medical science, the world's first partial heart transplant has achieved the expected outcome after over a year of research efforts. Carried out by Duke Health, the patient, a young individual, now exhibits functioning valves and arteries that are growing in tandem with the transplant, as initially expected by the medical team. In spring 2022, doctors carried out the procedure on a baby who needed a new heart valve. Before, they used non-living valves, which didn't grow with the child. This meant the child needed frequent replacements, and the surgeries had a 50 percent chance of being deadly. The new procedure avoids these problems, according to the team.

Babies with serious heart valve problems face a tough challenge because there aren't any implants that can grow with them. So, these babies end up needing new implants over and over until they're big enough for an adult-sized valve. It's a problem that doesn't have a solution yet. Duke Health doctors, leading a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, discovered that the innovative valve collection method used in the partial heart transplant resulted in two properly functioning valves and arteries that are growing along with the child, resembling natural blood vessels. "This publication is proof that this technology works, this idea works, and can be used to help other children," said Joseph W. Turek, first author of the study and Duke's chief of pediatric cardiac surgery, in a statement.
The research also notes that the new procedure requires less immunosuppressant medication, reducing potential long-term side effects.

It also facilitates a "domino transplant" method, where one donor heart benefits multiple patients, potentially doubling the number of hearts available for children with heart disease by utilizing previously unused hearts and valves.
Saludos.

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Re:STEM
« Respuesta #396 en: Enero 07, 2024, 20:17:53 pm »
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New Antibiotic Can Kill Drug-Resistant Bacteria
Posted by BeauHD on Thursday January 04, 2024 @02:00AM from the infectious-diseases dept.

fahrbot-bot shares a report from The Guardian:
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Scientists have discovered an entirely new class of antibiotic that appears to kill one of three bacteria considered to pose the greatest threat to human health because of their extensive drug-resistance. Zosurabalpin defeated highly drug-resistant strains of Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (Crab) in mouse models of pneumonia and sepsis, and was being tested in human trials. Crab is classified as a priority 1 critical pathogen by the World Health Organization, alongside two other drug-resistant forms of bacteria -- Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacteriaceae.

Antibiotic-resistant infections pose an urgent threat to human health -- particularly those caused by a large group of bacteria known as Gram-negative bacteria, which are protected by an outer shell containing a substance called lipopolysaccharide (LPS). "LPS allows bacteria to live in harsh environments, and it also allows them to evade attack by our immune system," said Dr Michael Lobritz, the global head of infectious diseases at Roche Pharma Research and Early Development in Basel Switzerland, which developed the new drug. No new antibiotic for Gram-negative bacteria have been approved in more than 50 years.

Roche had previously identified Zosurabalpin as capable of blocking the growth of A baumannii but it was not clear how it worked, or if it would be effective in animals with Crab-related infections. Through a series of experiments published in Nature, Prof Daniel Kahne at Harvard University in Cambridge, US, and colleagues showed that the drug prevented LPS from being transported to the outer membrane of the bacterium, killing it. They also found that Zosurabalpin considerably reduced levels of bacteria in mice with Crab-induced pneumonia and prevented the death of those with Crab-related sepsis. While [Lobritz] stressed that this molecule alone would not solve the public health threat of antimicrobial resistant infections, the discovery could lay the foundations for future efforts to drug the same transport system in other bacteria.
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Re:STEM
« Respuesta #397 en: Enero 09, 2024, 21:21:33 pm »
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Microsoft's New Battery is a Test of AI-Infused Scientific Discovery
Posted by msmash on Tuesday January 09, 2024 @11:49AM from the breakthroughs dept.

Harry McCracken, writing for FastCompany:
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Recently, Microsoft built a clock. Well, "built" may be overstating things. Members of the company's quantum computing team found a small digital clock in a wood case on Amazon -- the kind you might mistake for a nicer-than-usual trade show tchotchke. They hacked it to run off two experimental batteries they'd created in collaboration with staffers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Then they dressed up its enclosure by adding the logo of Azure Quantum Elements, the Microsoft platform for AI-enhanced scientific discovery that had been instrumental in developing the new battery technology.

The point of this little DIY project was to prove the batteries worked in a visceral way: "You want to have a wow moment," explains Brian Bilodeau, the head of partnerships, strategy, and operations for Azure Quantum. And the person the quantum team hoped to wow was Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella. Not that getting Nadella's attention was such a daunting prospect. Throwing vast amounts of Azure high-performance computing (HPC) resources at a big, hairy technical challenge such as materials research is the sort of challenge he's predisposed to take a personal interest in. Still, the tangible evidence of success made for a memorable moment: "I was very, very excited to see it come through," Nadella remembers.

The coin-sized CR2032 batteries powering the clock looked like the ones you might find in a pocket calculator or garage door opener. But on the inside, they used a solid-state electrolyte that replaces 70% of the lithium in garden-variety batteries with sodium. That holds the potential to address multiple issues with lithium batteries as we know them: their limited life on a charge, shrinking capacity over time, subpar performance in extreme temperatures, and risk of catching fire or even exploding. In addition, reducing lithium use in favor of cheap, plentiful sodium could be a boon to the fraught battery supply chain. With further development, the new material could benefit the myriad aspects of modern life that depend on batteries, from smartphones to EVs to the power grid. But Microsoft, being Microsoft, regards all this promise first and foremost as proof of Azure Quantum Elements' usefulness to the customers it's designed to serve. Unveiled last June, the cloud service is currently a "private preview" being tested by organizations such as Britain's Johnson Matthey, which is using it to help design catalytic converters and hydrogen fuel cells.
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Re:STEM
« Respuesta #398 en: Enero 10, 2024, 22:49:17 pm »
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DeepMind Spin-off Aims To Halve Drug Discovery Times Following Big Pharma Deals
Posted by msmash on Wednesday January 10, 2024 @09:42AM from the moving-forward dept.

The head of Google DeepMind believes its drug discovery spinout will halve the time taken to find new medicines, attracting the attention of the world's biggest pharmaceutical companies which are looking to artificial intelligence to revolutionise the lengthy process. From a report:
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Speaking to the Financial Times, Demis Hassabis, who co-founded Google's AI unit and also leads the drugs offshoot Isomorphic Labs, said the goal was to reduce the discovery stage -- when potential drugs are identified before clinical trials -- from the average of five years to two. "I think that would be success for us and be very meaningful," he said.

Hassabis stated the goal days after announcing Isomorphic Lab's first two pharmaceutical partnerships with Eli Lilly and Novartis, which came to a combined value of up to $3bn, in deals set to transform the finances of the unprofitable group. Isomorphic Labs uses an AI platform to predict biochemical structures, which aids the creation of new drugs by recommending which potential compounds will have the desired impact in the body. Including clinical trials, it often takes up to a decade to discover and develop a new drug, costing on average about $2.7bn, according to research by the Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development.

Large drugmakers, under pressure to fill their pipelines with new potential medicines while existing ones face patent cliffs, when they will face far cheaper generic competition, are eager for new ways to shorten the process. As healthcare systems around the world put pressure on drug prices, pharma companies are also looking for ways to cut costs in research and development. Hassabis said that many drugmakers had also been eager to partner with Isomorphic but the company wanted to focus on collaborations that could improve its technology.
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Re:STEM
« Respuesta #399 en: Enero 11, 2024, 08:07:20 am »
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A Huge Battery Has Replaced Hawaii's Last Coal Plant
Posted by BeauHD on Wednesday January 10, 2024 @08:30PM from the clean-energy-grid dept.

Julian Spector reports via Canary Media:
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Hawaii shut down its last coal plant on September 1, 2022, eliminating 180 megawatts of fossil-fueled baseload power from the grid on Oahu -- a crucial step in the state's first-in-the-nation commitment to cease burning fossil fuels for electricity by 2045. But the move posed a question that's becoming increasingly urgent as clean energy surges across the United States: How do you maintain a reliable grid while switching from familiar fossil plants to a portfolio of small and large renewables that run off the vagaries of the weather? Now Hawaii has an answer: It's a gigantic battery, unlike the gigantic batteries that have been built before.

The Kapolei Energy Storage system actually began commercial operations before Christmas on the industrial west side of Oahu, according to Plus Power, the Houston-based firm that developed and owns the project. Now, Kapolei's 158 Tesla Megapacks are charging and discharging based on signals from utility Hawaiian Electric. The plant's 185 megawatts of instantaneous discharge capacity match what the old coal plant could inject into the grid, though the batteries react far more quickly, with a 250-millisecond response time. Instead of generating power, they absorb it from the grid, ideally when it's flush with renewable generation, and deliver that cheap, clean power back in the evening hours when it's desperately needed.

The construction process had its setbacks, as did the broader effort to replace the coal plant with a roster of large-scale clean energy projects. The Kapolei battery was initially intended to come online before the coal plant retired. Covid disrupted deliveries for the grid battery industry across the board, and Kapolei's remote location in the middle of the Pacific Ocean didn't make things easier. By summer 2021, Plus Power was hoping to complete Kapolei by the end of 2022, but it ended up taking another year. Even then, it has joined the grid before several of the other large solar and battery projects slated to replace the coal plant's production with clean power.
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Re:STEM
« Respuesta #400 en: Enero 14, 2024, 21:31:13 pm »
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Chinese Company Announces Mass Production of Small Nuclear Battery With 50-Year Lifespan
Posted by EditorDavid on Sunday January 14, 2024 @07:34AM from the battery-builders dept.

"Chinese company Betavolt has announced an atomic energy battery for consumers with a touted 50-year lifespan," reports Tom's Hardware:
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The Betavolt BV100 will be the first product to launch using the firm's new atomic battery technology, constructed using a nickel -63 isotope and diamond semiconductor material. Betavolt says that its nuclear battery will target aerospace, AI devices, medical, MEMS systems, intelligent sensors, small drones, and robots — and may eventually mean manufacturers can sell smartphones that never need charging...

[T]he BV100, which is in the pilot stage ahead of mass production, doesn't offer a lot of power. This 15 x 15 x 5mm battery delivers 100 microwatts at 3 volts. It is mentioned that multiple BV100 batteries can be used together in series or parallel depending on device requirements. Betavolt also asserts that it has plans to launch a 1-watt version of its atomic battery in 2025. The new BV100 is claimed to be a disruptive product on two counts. Firstly, a safe miniature atomic battery with 50 years of maintenance-free stamina is a breakthrough. Secondly, Betavolt claims it is the only company in the world with the technology to dope large-size diamond semiconductor materials, as used by the BV100. It is using its 4th Gen diamond semiconductor material here...

[T]he Betavolt BV100 is claimed to be safe for consumers and won't leak radiation even if subjected to gunshots or puncture... Betavolt's battery uses a nickel -63 isotope as the energy source, which decays to a stable isotope of copper. This, plus the diamond semiconductor material, helps the BV100 operate stably in environments ranging from -60 to 120 degrees Celsius, according to the firm...

Betavolt will be well aware of devices with a greater thirst for power and teases that it is investigating isotopes such as strontium- 90, promethium- 147, and deuterium to develop atomic energy batteries with higher power levels and even longer service lives — up to 230 years.
Thanks to long-time Slashdot reader [url)https://www.slashdot.org/~hackingbear]hackingbear[/url] for sharing the news.

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Chinese-developed nuclear battery has a 50-year lifespan — Betavolt BV100 built with Nickel-63 isotope and diamond semiconductor material
The design uses China’s first diamond semiconductor material.

By Mark Tyson | 2024.01.13

Betavolt BV100 atomic battery | (Image credit: Betavolt)

Chinese company Betavolt has announced an atomic energy battery for consumers with a touted 50-year lifespan. The Betavolt BV100 will be the first product to launch using the firm’s new atomic battery technology, constructed using a nickel-63 isotope and diamond semiconductor material. Betavolt says its nuclear battery will target aerospace, AI devices, medical, MEMS systems, intelligent sensors, small drones, and robots – and may eventually mean manufacturers can sell smartphones that never need charging.

Buying an electronics product that can go without charging for 50 years would be amazing. But the BV100, which is in the pilot stage ahead of mass production, doesn’t offer a lot of power. This 15 x 15 x 5mm battery delivers 100 microwatts at 3 volts. The company says multiple BV100 batteries can be used together in series or parallel depending on device requirements, and Betavolt has plans to launch a 1-watt version of its atomic battery in 2025.

The new BV100 is claimed to be a disruptive product on two counts. Firstly, a safe miniature atomic battery with 50 years of maintenance-free stamina is a breakthrough. Secondly, Betavolt claims it is the only company in the world with the technology to dope large-size diamond semiconductor materials, as used by the BV100. The company is using its 4th gen diamond semiconductor material here.

In its press release, Betavolt says its atomic battery is very different from similarly described power cells developed by the US and USSR in the 1960s. It says that the old nuclear batteries were large, dangerous, hot, and expensive products. For example, some old-tech atomic batteries used Plutonium as the radioactive power source. Meanwhile, the Betavolt BV100 is claimed to be safe for consumers and won’t leak radiation even if subjected to gunshots or puncture.

Betavolt BV100 atomic battery (Image credit: Betavolt)

The new, improved levels of safety stem from the choice of materials. Betavolt’s battery uses a nickel-63 isotope as the energy source, which decays to a stable isotope of copper. This, plus the diamond semiconductor material, helps the BV100 operate stably in environments ranging from -60 to 120 degrees Celsius, according to the firm. Betavolt boasts that this battery technology is “way ahead” of European and American academic and commercial institutions.

How does Betavolt make this battery? We’ve already mentioned the essential materials, but the above diagram provides an excellent overview. The BV100 is made by “placing a 2-micron-thick nickel-63 sheet between two diamond semiconductor converters.” This construction relies on Betavolt’s “unique single-crystal diamond semiconductor that is just 10 microns thick.”

So, the current BV100 or its 1-watt successor scheduled for next year may not sound so impressive regarding peak power output. Betavolt will be well aware of devices with a greater thirst for power and teases that it is investigating isotopes such as strontium-90, promethium-147, and deuterium to develop atomic energy batteries with higher power levels and even longer service lives – up to 230 years.
Saludos.

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« Respuesta #401 en: Enero 15, 2024, 10:33:23 am »
Ni reactores nucleares ni hostias. Sevillana innovando en lo que realmente nos importa a todos :biggrin:

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« Respuesta #402 en: Enero 15, 2024, 12:10:39 pm »
Ni reactores nucleares ni hostias. Sevillana innovando en lo que realmente nos importa a todos :biggrin:

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Luego os preguntaréis de dónde viene esa envídia histórica hacia nosotros. Pues, de nuestra buena... salud.   :biggrin:

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« Respuesta #403 en: Enero 23, 2024, 08:12:49 am »
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Lamborghini Licenses MIT's New High-Capacity, Fast-Charging Organic Battery Tech
Posted by BeauHD on Monday January 22, 2024 @07:02PM from the future-of-EV-batteries dept.

An anonymous reader quotes a report from TechRadar:
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Thanks to new Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) research, which was part-funded by Lamborghini, we could soon see the end of difficult-to-source and often problematic rare metal materials featuring in the batteries of future electric vehicles. The MIT study's aim was to replace cobalt and nickel, typically used as a cathode in today's lithium-ion battery technology, with organic materials that could be produced at a much lower cost. This would also reduce the impact on the planet and conduct electricity at similar rates as cobalt batteries. [...] The research, which has been running for six years, has culminated in a novel organic material that could be a direct replacement for cobalt and nickel. According to details recently released by MIT, this material consists of many layers of TAQ (bis-tetraaminobenzoquinone), an organic small molecule that contains three fused hexagonal rings.

It's a complicated subject for those not donning lab coats for a living, but these TAQ layers can extend outward in every direction, forming a structure similar to graphite. Within the molecules are chemical groups called quinones, which are the electron reservoirs, and amines, which help the material to form strong hydrogen bonds, which ensure they don't dissolve into the battery electrolyte (something that has previously blighted organic cathode compounds), thus extending the lifetime of the battery. It comes as no surprise that Lamborghini has licensed the patent on this technology, seeing as it funded the research and has a certain Lanzador high performance electric vehicle in the pipeline.

Researchers say that tests of the material revealed that its conductivity and storage capacity were comparable to that of traditional cobalt-containing batteries. Also, batteries with a TAQ cathode can be charged and discharged faster than existing batteries, which could speed up the charging rate for electric vehicles. This speedy rate of charge and discharge could help give something like Lamborghini's Lanzador a performance edge, while super-fast charging capabilities will negate the need for lengthy charging stops -- something the Italian marque's discerning clientele will likely be opposed to. However, Lamborghini is also part of the wider Volkswagen Group and seeing that the primary materials needed to manufacture this type of cathode are already commercially available and produced in large quantities as commodity chemicals, we may see the battery tech filter down to more affordable EVs in the future.
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« Respuesta #404 en: Enero 30, 2024, 08:53:19 am »
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Neuralink Implants Brain Chip In First Human
Posted by BeauHD on Tuesday January 30, 2024 @02:00AM from the so-far-so-good dept.

According to Neuralink founder Elon Musk, the first human received an implant from the brain-chip startup on Sunday and is recovering well. "Initial results show promising neuron spike detection," Musk added. Reuters reports:
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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration had given the company clearance last year to conduct its first trial to test its implant on humans. The startup's PRIME Study is a trial for its wireless brain-computer interface to evaluate the safety of the implant and surgical robot. The study will assess the functionality of the interface which enables people with quadriplegia, or paralysis of all four limbs, to control devices with their thoughts, according to the company's website.
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