* Blog


* Últimos mensajes


* Temas mas recientes

PPCC: Pisitófilos Creditófagos. Primavera 2024 por Cadavre Exquis
[Ayer a las 22:02:22]


Geopolitica siglo XXI por saturno
[Junio 17, 2024, 19:21:28 pm]


XTE-Central 2024 : El opio del pueblo por saturno
[Junio 17, 2024, 18:47:16 pm]


Coches electricos por Cadavre Exquis
[Junio 17, 2024, 08:01:36 am]


Autor Tema: Re: Tema: PPCC - Pisitófilos Creditófagos - Primavera 2023  (Leído 434407 veces)

0 Usuarios y 2 Visitantes están viendo este tema.

Benzino Napaloni

  • Estructuralista
  • ****
  • Gracias
  • -Dadas: 875
  • -Recibidas: 16297
  • Mensajes: 1937
  • Nivel: 184
  • Benzino Napaloni Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Benzino Napaloni Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Benzino Napaloni Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Benzino Napaloni Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Benzino Napaloni Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Benzino Napaloni Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Benzino Napaloni Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Benzino Napaloni Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Benzino Napaloni Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Benzino Napaloni Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Benzino Napaloni Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Benzino Napaloni Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.
    • Ver Perfil
Re: Tema: PPCC - Pisitófilos Creditófagos - Primavera 2023
« Respuesta #270 en: Marzo 26, 2023, 20:49:42 pm »
https://techcrunch.com/2023/03/26/tech-company-layoffs-2023-morale/

Citar
The layoffs will continue until (investor) morale improves

[...]

An argument could be made, of course, that these companies overhired during the recent tech boom, and now it’s time to right size to better fit a changing market. That argument would carry more weight if the companies in question weren’t profitable. However, large American tech companies are very often both profitable and incredibly wealthy, even if their market cap has fallen from record highs.

While there is some truth to the idea that companies grew too quickly in recent years and need to reset, layoffs feel like the worst kind of short-term thinking: sacrificing employees to please investors. Are companies at least getting what they want from investors out of this devil’s bargain?
[/color]

Si se confirma, esto es un puro y simple suicidio. Ahora que el invierno demográfico golpea, y ni se contempla la opción de externalizar -era la bomba hace 20 años y acabó en un fiasco monumental-, ¿de dónde piensan sacar más mano de obra?

Que recen para que les alcance con la que les ha quedado, porque como los proyectos se resientan, estas empresas lo van a pasar mal.

Derby

  • Sabe de economía
  • *****
  • Gracias
  • -Dadas: 21096
  • -Recibidas: 90918
  • Mensajes: 10660
  • Nivel: 1054
  • Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.
    • Ver Perfil
Re: Tema: PPCC - Pisitófilos Creditófagos - Primavera 2023
« Respuesta #271 en: Marzo 26, 2023, 20:58:45 pm »
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2023-03-26/ecb-s-guindos-says-banking-turmoil-shadowing-rate-policy-moves

Citar
ECB’s Guindos Says Bank Turmoil Shadowing Rate Policy Moves
*Central banker wants to see ‘clear decline’ in core inflation
*Data this week likely to show euro-era record in core prices


European Central Bank Vice President Luis de Guindos said the banking sector is “going through a period of very high uncertainty” that dictates a meeting-by meeting approach on interest rate policy with no pre-commitment to a specific action.

“We are open-minded with respect to the future,” the Spanish banker said in an interview with Business Post posted on the ECB’s website on Sunday.

“The question now is how the events in the US banking system and Credit Suisse will impact the euro-area economy,” he said. “Over the next weeks and months, we need to assess whether they will give rise to an additional tightening of financing conditions.”

Guindos said the ECB’s main concern in terms of financial stability following the fall of Credit Suisse Group AG is the situation of the non-banks, which have been growing as share of the financial system in Europe and have taken a lot of risks during the times of very low-interest rates in terms of liquidity, duration, credit, and leverage.

“We are not the supervisors of non-banks — but non-banks are interconnected with the traditional banks we supervise, and that’s why we also look into this sector,he said.

The situation is quite different than the financial crisis in 2008 as banks have much better capital and liquidity positions, well above minimum requirements, he said.

The ECB on March 16 stuck to its stated intention and raised interest rates by half a percentage point. It gave no guidance on its future steps, a departure from its usual practice at recent meetings, adding that the uncertainty related to the health of the banking sector “reinforces” its data-dependent approach.

‘Timely’ Return

Guindos said he wants a “timely” return to the ECB’s goal of 2% inflation.

“We know it cannot be tomorrow, but it has to be within our projection horizon, which is a period of two years,he said, adding that “the trajectory of inflation is much more important than just touching the 2% target.”

Headline inflation in the euro-zone is set to decline quite rapidly over the next six to seven months as base effects kick in, he said, noting that falling energy prices, a reduction of supply-side bottlenecks and the lagged impact of rate hikes will all play a role.

“I am positive about the decline of headline inflation, but we need to look very carefully at the evolution of core inflation,” Guindos said. “To reach our target, core inflation must also start to decelerate.”   

Euro-Area Core Inflation Is Refusing to Slow

“It is very difficult to converge toward the 2% target in a sustainable way without a clear decline in core inflation,” Guindos said.

Speaking at a conference on Sunday, Executive Board member Isabel Schnabel highlighted that “headline inflation has started to decline, but core inflation proves sticky,” according to slides published on the ECB’s website.

Entrevista a De Guindos https://www.ecb.europa.eu/press/inter/date/2023/html/ecb.in230326~d58344edad.en.html
“Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms — to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.”— Viktor E. Frankl
https://www.hks.harvard.edu/more/policycast/happiness-age-grievance-and-fear

Derby

  • Sabe de economía
  • *****
  • Gracias
  • -Dadas: 21096
  • -Recibidas: 90918
  • Mensajes: 10660
  • Nivel: 1054
  • Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.
    • Ver Perfil
Re: Tema: PPCC - Pisitófilos Creditófagos - Primavera 2023
« Respuesta #272 en: Marzo 26, 2023, 21:25:05 pm »
https://www.nytimes.com/2023/03/26/opinion/china-finance-banking-evergrande-crisis.html

Citar
How China Keeps Putting Off Its ‘Lehman Moment’

HONG KONG — Remember the Evergrande crisis?

It was little more than a year ago that Evergrande Group, the Chinese property developer, was about to collapse under more than $300 billion in debt. There were warnings of a catastrophic default that would ripple through China’s economy, maybe even set off a global depression. China, it was said, faced its “Lehman moment” — when a corporate failure like that which felled the once-venerable Wall Street investment bank in 2008 finally forces Chinese Communist Party policymakers to reckon with systemic financial weakness.

Not quite. Evergrande is not out of the woods, but a catastrophic implosion has been avoided after the Chinese government stepped in to help arrange a restructuring of much of its debt. Well before a new threat to the global financial order emerged this month — the collapse of Silicon Valley Bank in the United States — Evergrande had largely fallen out of the headlines.

Evergrande’s troubles weren’t the first time we’ve heard predictions of Chinese financial doom. They tend to resurface every few years. But Wall Street, the Western media and economists who repeat them make the fundamental mistake of applying pure market logic to China’s economy, and it just doesn’t work that way.

China is still not a fully market economy, despite the country’s 2001 entry into the World Trade Organization, decades of economic reform and a slow but steady integration into the global financial system.

That doesn’t mean China can indefinitely defy economic orthodoxy, and debt levels in its financial system are alarmingly high. But the doom and gloom is usually overblown because the government has virtually unlimited power to head off crises by directing resources — and apportioning pain — as its sees fit, often by ordering banks and other creditors to accept losses for the greater good before things get out of hand.

Evergrande is a prime example. One of China’s largest real estate developers, it amassed huge debts to expand its business, as did many of its rivals. But when China’s government began imposing financial restrictions on property companies in 2020 out of concern over spiralling debt and home prices, Evergrande was cut off from further fund-raising and formally defaulted on its debts in December 2021. The “Lehman” warnings reached a crescendo.

But Chinese officials had already been at work corralling Evergrande executives, creditors and potential asset buyers to begin restructuring the company’s obligations. Domestic lenders eventually agreed to give Evergrande more time to repay loans. A deal to resolve Evergrande’s offshore debt also is reportedly imminent.

In 2008, the U.S. Federal Reserve and Treasury Department also stepped in during the subprime lending crisis to coordinate the restructuring of troubled institutions. But creditor and investor rights and the political risks of bailing out banks limited what American regulators can do; arrangements were reached only after hard bargaining with banks and investment houses. In China, financial institutions have to do what the government tells them.

The government’s hand is everywhere. The most fundamental asset in China — land — is owned or controlled by the state. The value of China’s currency, the renminbi, is government-managed and regulators are widely believed to intervene in trading on the country’s stock markets.

Most of China’s biggest and most powerful companies, including all of its major banks, are state-owned, and executives are usually members of the Communist Party, which controls top-level corporate appointments. Party committees within corporations further ensure that many important business decisions align with government policy. Even healthy and influential private companies can be ordered to undergo painful restructuring or curtail certain business operations, as a government crackdown on e-commerce leader Alibaba and other Chinese tech giants that began in 2020 made clear.

Ultimately, all of this serves the party’s absolute priority of maintaining social stability; there is zero tolerance for financial distress or major corporate failures that could trigger street demonstrations. And government control of the business sector is only increasing.

Even the makeup of China’s high debt levels has a silver lining for regulators. China’s aggregate ratio of debt to gross domestic product was almost 300 percent (or around $52 trillion) in September 2022, compared to 257 percent for the United States. But less than 5 percent of China’s debt is external, amounting to $2.5 trillion, one-tenth of the U.S. level. When nearly every renminbi borrowed is domestic — lent by a Chinese creditor to a Chinese borrower — it gives regulators a degree of control over debt problems that their Western counterparts can only dream of.

China has encountered its share of financial distress during its decades-long transition to a modern industrial economy, but regulators have used their considerable powers to repeatedly prevent catastrophe. When the percentage of nonperforming loans at Chinese state-owned commercial banks hit an alarming 30 percent in 1999 (the U.S. rate, by comparison, has remained in single digits for decades), authorities formed asset management companies to take over those bad loans. During the 2008 financial crisis, China implemented a massive stimulus package to protect its economy.

Still, warnings of a Chinese financial reckoning resurface now and again. In 2014, when a Chinese solar-panel manufacturer defaulted on bonds, some intoned that this could be China’s “Bear Stearns moment,” referring to another U.S. investment bank that collapsed in 2008. But can anyone even remember the name of that Chinese company anymore? (Shanghai Chaori Solar Energy Science and Technology, for the record).

But instead of introducing reforms to establish a healthy market-based economy in which inefficient businesses are allowed to fail, China’s Evergrande-style fixes — while defusing short-term crises — reward irresponsible behavior and perpetuate the excessive borrowing and wasteful use of funding that leads to recurring financial distress.

Soft landings may become harder to achieve. China faces perhaps its greatest array of economic challenges since it began reopening to the outside world in the late 1970s: high debt, an ailing real estate sector, a long-term economic slowdown, rising unemployment, an aging and shrinking population and worsening trade and diplomatic relations with the United States.

There is a very real risk that China could suffer the same fate as Japan, which is still struggling to emerge from an extended period of economic stagnation that began in the 1990s. Japan’s troubles were caused, in part, by a burst real estate bubble and financial-sector problems similar to what China is now facing.

China’s regulatory troubleshooters have proven the financial doomsayers wrong again and again. But their biggest test may yet lie ahead.
“Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms — to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.”— Viktor E. Frankl
https://www.hks.harvard.edu/more/policycast/happiness-age-grievance-and-fear

Derby

  • Sabe de economía
  • *****
  • Gracias
  • -Dadas: 21096
  • -Recibidas: 90918
  • Mensajes: 10660
  • Nivel: 1054
  • Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.
    • Ver Perfil
Re: Tema: PPCC - Pisitófilos Creditófagos - Primavera 2023
« Respuesta #273 en: Marzo 26, 2023, 22:18:45 pm »
https://www.marketwatch.com/story/some-losses-in-commercial-real-estate-and-treasurys-may-still-need-to-work-through-the-banking-sector-says-feds-kashkari-d78f89a6

Citar
‘Some losses’ in commercial real estate and Treasurys may still need to work ‘through the banking sector,’ says Fed’s Kashkari

‘There are a lot of commercial real-estate assets in the banking sector and there are some losses there that will probably work its way through the banking sector. So that process will take time to fully become clear.’ — Neel Kashkari, Minneapolis Fed president

That’s Neel Kashkari, president and chief executive officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, explaining the state of the banking system during a Sunday interview on CBS’s “Face the Nation.”

Jitters surrounding banks have raised some questions about the roughly $5.5 trillion U.S. commercial real estate debt market.

Rising interest rates can make it harder to refinance debt for property owners and overall values of debt tied to real estate have slumped, weighing on banks who have exposures. Small banks have become key players in commercial real estate over the past two decades.

The Fed president emphasized that the banking system “is resilient and it’s sound,” but cautioned that the troubles emanating from the banking sector may not be over.

“We know that there are other banks that have some exposure to long-date Treasury bonds, who have some duration risk, as they call it, on their books,” Kashkari said.

He said that current challenges with banks “definitely brings us closer” to recession but warned that it may still be too early to know the impact of troubled banks on the economy.

Kashkari said while large deposit outflows that some small to midsize banks have experienced in recent weeks have slowed, parts of the capital markets “have largely been closed” for weeks.(...)

https://twitter.com/FaceTheNation/status/1640018060672204802
“Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms — to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.”— Viktor E. Frankl
https://www.hks.harvard.edu/more/policycast/happiness-age-grievance-and-fear

Derby

  • Sabe de economía
  • *****
  • Gracias
  • -Dadas: 21096
  • -Recibidas: 90918
  • Mensajes: 10660
  • Nivel: 1054
  • Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.
    • Ver Perfil
Re: Tema: PPCC - Pisitófilos Creditófagos - Primavera 2023
« Respuesta #274 en: Marzo 27, 2023, 00:30:34 am »
https://www.chicagotribune.com/business/ct-biz-salesforce-meta-sublease-downtown-offices-20230324-tibalad3l5do3fxjngijqntr64-story.html

Citar
Salesforce, Meta looking to sublease downtown office space

Salesforce and Meta are looking to sublease significant portions of their downtown office space, spokespeople for both companies confirmed.

Both tech companies announced mass layoffs in recent months. The downtown sublets were first reported by CoStar News.

A Salesforce spokesperson confirmed Friday that the company planned to sublease about 125,000 square feet of office space in the 1.2 million-square-foot Salesforce Tower at Wolf Point along the Chicago River downtown, a figure that represents about a quarter of the space it originally planned to occupy in the building. The company said last year it planned to move employees into the tower this spring. On Friday, a spokesperson said Salesforce staff would start working there in June.

In January, Salesforce announced plans to let go of about 8,000 employees, or about 10% of its workforce. A company spokesperson declined to specify how many affected workers were based in Chicago. As of 2021, Salesforce had more than 2,000 employees in the Chicago area.

Meta, which has also announced massive job cuts in recent months, confirmed plans to sublease five floors, or about 115,000 square feet, of its office space at 151 N. Franklin St. That represents nearly 44% of its space in the building, which it leased in 2018.

Meta announced 11,000 layoffs last fall and announced another 10,000 cuts earlier this month.

“The past few years have brought new possibilities around the role of the office, and we are prioritizing making focused, balanced investments to support our most strategic long-term priorities and lead the way in creating the workplace of the future,” a Meta spokesperson said in a statement. “We remain committed to Chicago and look forward to years of innovation ahead.”

Meta’s agreement to occupy 263,000 square feet in 151 N. Franklin St., now called CNA Center, made it one of the largest tenants, according to CoStar. CNA Insurance established its 298,000-square-foot headquarters there when the 35-story West Loop tower, developed by John Buck Co., opened in 2018, while law firm Hinshaw & Culbertson occupies several floors in the almost fully leased building.

CNA Center includes a rooftop garden, an outdoor terrace on the second floor and a public plaza, amenities sought by many companies trying to bring people back from comfy home offices, so Meta’s offering may attract a lot of interest. But that could also mean more bad news for the Central Loop. Packed with older buildings offering fewer amenities, its landlords already struggle to keep their remaining tenants.

Although many Chicago companies were reluctant to sign new leases or expand their footprints in 2022, the vacancy rate for top West Loop office properties fell to 15.1% by the end of the year, according to Colliers International, while the Central Loop hit a historic high of 25.9% as employers there shed space. Top River North properties saw their vacancy rate sink to 13.5% in 2022.

Salesforce Tower, located at 333 W. Wolf Point Plaza west of the Merchandise Mart, will start filling up this spring. Its Houston-based developer Hines signed a 500,000-square-foot lease agreement with Salesforce in 2018, also giving the software firm naming rights to the 60-story tower, designed by Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects.

Hines broke ground weeks after the COVID-19 pandemic hit in early 2020. Salesforce Tower was the last of three buildings at the developer’s Wolf Point complex, with the first pair dedicated to residences. In 2021 law firm Kirkland & Ellis, now located at 300 N. LaSalle St., signed a deal to occupy 662,000 square feet.

Both Salesforce and Kirkland & Ellis will move in starting April 1, according to CoStar.
“Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms — to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.”— Viktor E. Frankl
https://www.hks.harvard.edu/more/policycast/happiness-age-grievance-and-fear

Cadavre Exquis

  • Sabe de economía
  • *****
  • Gracias
  • -Dadas: 20066
  • -Recibidas: 45160
  • Mensajes: 9473
  • Nivel: 560
  • Cadavre Exquis Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Cadavre Exquis Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Cadavre Exquis Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Cadavre Exquis Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Cadavre Exquis Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Cadavre Exquis Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Cadavre Exquis Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Cadavre Exquis Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Cadavre Exquis Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Cadavre Exquis Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Cadavre Exquis Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Cadavre Exquis Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.
    • Ver Perfil

Derby

  • Sabe de economía
  • *****
  • Gracias
  • -Dadas: 21096
  • -Recibidas: 90918
  • Mensajes: 10660
  • Nivel: 1054
  • Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Derby Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.
    • Ver Perfil
Re: Tema: PPCC - Pisitófilos Creditófagos - Primavera 2023
« Respuesta #276 en: Marzo 27, 2023, 08:38:39 am »
https://www.ft.com/content/70968033-1dbf-4e31-86a9-6271106be1fc

Citar
First Citizens to buy failed Silicon Valley Bank

Family-owned company’s acquisition of tech-focused lender’s deposits and loans follows sale of collapsed Signature Bank

First Citizens Bank will buy much of Silicon Valley Bank, US regulators said, as they estimated the lender’s collapse would lead to $20bn of losses for a deposit insurance fund paid for by banks.

The Raleigh, North Carolina-based lender will take on all $119bn of deposits at SVB, the once high-flying lender to tech start-ups and their investors that failed this month. First Citizens will also take over SVB’s loans and operate its 17 branches, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation said on Sunday evening.

First Citizens will buy about $72bn of SVB’s assets at a discount, leaving about $90bn of securities and other assets with the FDIC, which is acting as its receiver.

As it announced the deal, the FDIC said the failure of SVB could cost its Deposit Insurance Fund, paid for by member banks, about $20bn.

First Citizens, which calls itself the nation’s largest family-controlled bank, has been one of the biggest buyers of troubled banks in recent years.

Frank Holding Jr took over the job as chief executive of First Citizens, which was started by his grandfather in 1898, in 2008. He has since overseen nearly two dozen acquisitions in FDIC-assisted bank deals. Last year, First Citizens paid $2bn to acquire CIT, a lender to midsized corporations.

The addition of SVB’s business will significantly increase the size of First Citizens, which as of the end of last year had just over $100bn in assets and nearly $90bn in deposits, placing it as the US’s 36th largest bank, by assets. As of Friday, First Citizens bank had a market value of just over $8bn.

The deal follows a similar takeover announced a week ago for Signature Bank, the operations of which were sold to New York Community Bank-owned Flagstar.

As part of that deal, the FDIC was forced to retain $60bn worth of Signature’s loans. The federal agency has estimated that the failure and resolution of Signature bank could cost the FDIC’s insurance fund $2.5bn.

The plunge in SVB’s shares at the start of this month set off worries of brewing problems at regional lenders and the US financial system. On March 10, SVB was taken over by the FDIC after losses on its security portfolio and a failed equity raise spooked investors and depositors.

That kicked off an auction led by the FDIC for the failed lender. Along with a number of regional banks, private equity investors including Blackstone, Apollo, Carlyle, Sixth Street and HPS Investment Partners inspected SVB’s loans to consider possible offers, according to people with knowledge of the matter.
“Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms — to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.”— Viktor E. Frankl
https://www.hks.harvard.edu/more/policycast/happiness-age-grievance-and-fear

asustadísimos

  • Espectador
  • ***
  • Gracias
  • -Dadas: 1000
  • -Recibidas: 35614
  • Mensajes: 1399
  • Nivel: 396
  • asustadísimos Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.asustadísimos Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.asustadísimos Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.asustadísimos Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.asustadísimos Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.asustadísimos Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.asustadísimos Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.asustadísimos Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.asustadísimos Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.asustadísimos Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.asustadísimos Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.asustadísimos Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.
    • Ver Perfil
Re: Tema: PPCC - Pisitófilos Creditófagos - Primavera 2023
« Respuesta #277 en: Marzo 27, 2023, 09:39:27 am »
[El capitalismo ha FRACASADO en la provisión de vivienda. Pero los atentados no los perpetran los capitalistas, sino los capitalistitas. No basta con LAMENTAR, hay que CONDENAR.]


JENOFONTE10

  • Netocrata
  • ****
  • Gracias
  • -Dadas: 25612
  • -Recibidas: 21468
  • Mensajes: 2989
  • Nivel: 369
  • JENOFONTE10 Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.JENOFONTE10 Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.JENOFONTE10 Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.JENOFONTE10 Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.JENOFONTE10 Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.JENOFONTE10 Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.JENOFONTE10 Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.JENOFONTE10 Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.JENOFONTE10 Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.JENOFONTE10 Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.JENOFONTE10 Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.JENOFONTE10 Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • Propietario de pisito sin deuda
    • Ver Perfil
Re: Tema: PPCC - Pisitófilos Creditófagos - Primavera 2023
« Respuesta #278 en: Marzo 27, 2023, 10:16:43 am »
BANCOS CENTRALES Y 'NUEVO MODELO' DE ASISTENCIA FINANCIERA

Cita de: J.C.Ureta, R-4, 27-3-2023
Por qué los Bancos Centrales mantienen su hoja de ruta (y por qué es lo adecuado)

No deja de ser llamativo que una semana que empezó, el pasado lunes, con cierta tranquilidad y con subidas, tras el anuncio de los principales Bancos Centrales del mundo comprometiéndose a actuar coordinadamente para garantizar la liquidez del sistema bancario, haya terminado el viernes con nuevas inquietudes sobre la salud del sistema bancario, alimentadas, esta vez, por el principal Banco alemán, el Deutsche Bank, que llegó a desplomarse un 14% en una jornada caótica para la banca europea, con caídas que, por ejemplo, en el BBVA y el Santander llegaron a superar el 5%.

Tal vez la explicación de ese cambio de sentimiento del mercado tenga que ver con la reunión del Comité monetario de la Reserva Federal americana el pasado miércoles, en la que, siguiendo los pasos dados la semana previa por el BCE, la Fed se aferró a la hoja de ruta trazada previamente, subiendo los tipos de interés y reiterando que la lucha contra la inflación sigue siendo la prioridad, y que esa lucha no se va a ver afectada por los problemas de algunos Bancos, porque, en palabras de Powell: “Sin estabilidad de precios la economía no funciona para nadie”. Una idea al parecer compartida por otros Bancos Centrales como el Banco de Inglaterra, que subió los tipos en 25 puntos básicos, hasta el 4,25%, tan sólo un día después de conocerse que en febrero la inflación repuntó en el Reino Unido al 10,4%, tres décimas más que el mes previo, o los Bancos Centrales de Noruega y Suiza, que subieron los tipos 25 y 50 puntos básicos, respectivamente, en el caso del Banco Nacional Suizo sólo días después del rescate a Credit Suisse.

La Fed, el BCE y los restantes Bancos Centrales parten de la base de que el sector bancario, en su conjunto, es muy sólido y puede encajar sin mayores problemas el inevitable daño económico que, como el mismo Jerome Powell reconoció en comparecencia del miércoles pasado, conlleva la lucha contra la inflación. Esa convicción profunda sobre la solidez del sistema bancario es la que está detrás de la firmeza en seguir subiendo los tipos en medio de las turbulencias del sector, y es justo reconocer que, si alguien tiene información y datos como para saber o no si la banca está bien, son los Bancos Centrales.

La irrupción el viernes de esta “tercera entrega” de la crisis bancaria, con la turbulencia de Deutsche Bank, tras el cierre del Silicon Valley Bank y otros Bancos regionales en Estados Unidos, y tras haber sido vendido el fin de semana anterior de forma precipitada a UBS nada más y nada menos que el otro emblema de la banca suiza, el Credit Suisse, podría llevar a la conclusión de que la Fed y el BCE se equivocan al minusvalorar el alcance que la crisis bancaria pueda tener. Sin embargo, hay razones poderosas para pensar que los Bancos Centrales están haciendo lo correcto y que su enfoque de tratar de forma diferenciada y con herramientas distintas el problema de la crisis bancaria y el problema de la inflación es el camino a seguir, porque, como dijo Christine Lagarde en la rueda de prensa posterior a la última reunión del BCE: “No hay por qué elegir entre estabilidad financiera y estabilidad de precios”. Son dos problemas que tienen tratamientos separados.

Durante los últimos quince años, desde 2008, tras la quiebra de Lehman, los supervisores bancarios han estado obligando a los Bancos a reforzar su capital, preparándoles para algo tan simple como que si hay problemas en algún Banco sean sus accionistas quienes los pagan y nadie más, ni los depositantes ni los contribuyentes. Eso es justamente lo que ha pasado con el Silicon Valley Bank, con los restantes Bancos regionales americanos cerrados estos días y con el Credit Suisse, aunque en este último caso la pérdida se ha extendido, con una discutible alteración del orden habitual de prelación, a los llamados bonos AT1, que en principio son instrumentos pensados para soportar las pérdidas, pero sólo después del capital y no antes. Dejando aparte el tema de los AT1 de Credit Suisse, la realidad es que el modelo está funcionando, y el capital (o instrumentos asimilados) se esté demostrando suficiente como para absorber los problemas de balance de entidades que han sido mal gestionadas, y que han caído en problemas al subir los tipos de interés y al desacelerarse la economía.

Al famoso inversor Warren Buffet le gusta decir que “cuando baja la marea se ve quién estaba nadando desnudo”, y eso es lo que está pasando ahora en el sector bancario y lo que irá pasando en otros sectores a medida que avance el ajuste. Lo que nos dicen el BCE y la Fed es que en la banca hay pocas entidades que realmente estén nadando desnudas, y nos dicen también que esas entidades no van a provocar un contagio al resto, entre otras cosas porque, acertadamente, los Bancos Centrales se han apresurado a crear un cortafuegos, ofreciendo amplias líneas de liquidez a la banca para que, si se extendiese la desconfianza, los Bancos puedan responder a cualquier demanda de liquidez de sus depositantes, por muy alta que sea.

Una muestra de que el tratamiento que se está dando por parte de los Bancos Centrales es el adecuado es que prácticamente todas las Bolsas han subido esta última semana, a pesar de las turbulencias del sector bancario. El Eurostoxx ha subido el 1,6% en la semana, el Dax el 1,3% pese a la caída de Deutsche Bank, el S&P el 1,4%, el Dow el 1,2%, el Nasdaq el 1,6%, el Nikkei el 0,2% y el MSCI de Bolsas emergentes en dólares el 2,2%. Incluso nuestro Ibex, en el que tanto peso tiene el sector bancario, ha subido el 0,8% en la semana. Esto quiere decir, a nuestro juicio, que las Bolsas no ven crisis bancaria general, ni cataclismo o colapso de la economía.

En el mismo sentido, otra muestra de que los ajustes de la economía y de los mercados están funcionando es que los tipos de interés de los bonos soberanos hayan bajado de forma importante estas dos últimas semanas. El tipo de interés del bono del Tesoro americano a 2 años que hace tan sólo quince días superaba el 5% cerró el viernes a 3,76%. El tipo del bono del Tesoro americano a diez años (T bond) ha pasado en dos semanas de estar por encima del 4% al 3,37% al que cerró el viernes. Igualmente, el bono del Tesoro alemán a diez años (bund) ha pasado del 2,75% que pagaba a principios de febrero al 2,15% al que cerró el viernes pasado. Estos ajustes a la baja de los tipos de interés alivian a los Bancos y son una muestra más de ese modelo de “ajuste ordenado” por el que venimos apostando en estos comentarios. Lo mismo podríamos decir de la caída del precio del petróleo.

Ahora bien, dicho lo anterior, hay que decir también que lo que está pasando va a tener impacto negativo tanto en el sector bancario como en la economía real.

Empezando por el sector bancario, parece obvio que, incluso los Bancos bien gestionados y con buen balance, que son la mayoría, van a ver subir su coste del capital. Los inversores serán más cautelosos con los Bancos a la hora de invertir en sus acciones o en sus bonos y eso supondrá para la banca incrementar el coste de capital y el coste financiero en general, creando así una dificultad adicional a un sector que viene ya muy castigado. Frente a quienes opinaban que la subida de los tipos de interés daba a los Bancos unos beneficios “caídos del cielo” va a empezar a comprobarse que la subida de los tipos de interés tiene efectos laterales negativos sobre el balance, y esto va a ser, lamentablemente, bien visible en los próximos meses. La consecuencia es que los Bancos que no estén preparados y tengan que buscar capital tendrán dificultades para encontrarlo y deberán pagar un coste mucho mayor.

Una derivada muy directa de lo anterior es que los Bancos, al subir su coste de capital, tendrán una menor capacidad de dar crédito, que se irá notando como es lógico a medida que avance la recomposición del mapa bancario. Esa es la principal consecuencia para la economía real de lo que está pasando en los Bancos, y lo que nos indica es que, lejos del espejismo del “no aterrizaje” con el que soñaron las Bolsas el pasado enero, la realidad es que el aterrizaje viene ya y los Bancos Centrales probablemente deberán hacer una pausa en la normalización monetaria para evitar un aterrizaje demasiado “duro”.

Como la Fed señalizó de forma bastante clara en su comunicado del pasado miércoles, puede estar bastante próxima una pausa en la subida de tipos. En el comunicado desaparecía la mención habitual a "sucesivas subidas" de los tipos de interés para sugerir la posibilidad de "alguna reafirmación adicional" de la política monetaria y las proyecciones de los miembros de la institución, el famoso “dot plot”, sitúan el precio del dinero al cierre de 2023 ligeramente por encima del 5%, lo que, a priori, dejaría apenas margen para una subida más desde los niveles actuales. La idea parece ser esperar a ver el impacto de las medias monetarias en la economía real, un impacto que lleva un desfase temporal (‘delay’) pero que ya se está empezando a ver, no sólo en el sector bancario sino también en los despidos de las tecnológicas y, aunque sea todavía de forma muy suave, en la evolución del consumo.

Pero una cosa es una pausa y otra es bajar tipos, es decir, el llamado “pívot”. A nuestro juicio, quienes esperen que la Fed o los Bancos Centrales, en general, vayan a bajar los tipos probablemente van a verse frustrados porque el nuevo modelo de asistencia financiera por los Bancos Centrales ya no es el de “rescate general” sino el de rescate selectivo, limitado y condicionado. Los Bancos Centrales van a evitar el “accidente monetario”, tipo Lehman, pero no van a volver a caer en la trampa de forzar el crecimiento económico a base de dinero gratis.

Esta semana conoceremos el avance del IPC de la zona euro y dato final de PIB americano del cuarto trimestre, pero toda la atención está en el sector bancario y, en particular, en el Deutsche Bank.

Aun a riesgo de equivocarnos, pensamos que los mercados se van a ir tranquilizando a medida que entiendan que la hoja de ruta trazada por los Bancos Centrales es la única posible y que poner las esperanzas en un nuevo rescate general por parte de la Fed es no sólo ilusorio sino además equivocado.

https://www.r4.com/articulos-y-analisis/opinion-de-expertos/por-que-los-bancos-centrales-mantienen-su-hoja-de-ruta-y-por-que-es-lo-adecuado

Saludos.
Entonces se dijeron unos a otros: «¡Vamos! Fabriquemos ladrillos y pongámoslos a cocer al fuego». Y usaron ladrillos en lugar de piedra, y el asfalto les sirvió de mezcla.[Gn 11,3] No les teman. No hay nada oculto que no deba ser revelado, y nada secreto que no deba ser conocido. [Mt 10, 26]

sudden and sharp

  • Administrator
  • Sabe de economía
  • *****
  • Gracias
  • -Dadas: 50299
  • -Recibidas: 59928
  • Mensajes: 9914
  • Nivel: 984
  • sudden and sharp Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.sudden and sharp Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.sudden and sharp Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.sudden and sharp Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.sudden and sharp Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.sudden and sharp Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.sudden and sharp Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.sudden and sharp Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.sudden and sharp Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.sudden and sharp Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.sudden and sharp Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.sudden and sharp Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.
    • Ver Perfil

Saturio

  • Netocrata
  • ****
  • Gracias
  • -Dadas: 854
  • -Recibidas: 26392
  • Mensajes: 3410
  • Nivel: 659
  • Saturio Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Saturio Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Saturio Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Saturio Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Saturio Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Saturio Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Saturio Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Saturio Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Saturio Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Saturio Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Saturio Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Saturio Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.
    • Ver Perfil
Re: Tema: PPCC - Pisitófilos Creditófagos - Primavera 2023
« Respuesta #280 en: Marzo 27, 2023, 11:39:25 am »
Hoy mismo, a estas horas, estamos exportando el equivalente a toda nuestra producción eólica, que por otra parte es el 20,2% de lo que estamos generando.
La fotovoltaica está generando un 32,5%
Nucleares 20%
Gas y Carbón no llegan al 8%, más o menos como la hidráulica.

Por un lado la exportación de energía mejora nuestra balanza comercial pero por otro significa que hay una demanda externa que nos sube los precios interiores.




Zugzwang

  • Novatillo
  • **
  • Gracias
  • -Dadas: 3205
  • -Recibidas: 3360
  • Mensajes: 233
  • Nivel: 57
  • Zugzwang Se le empieza a escucharZugzwang Se le empieza a escucharZugzwang Se le empieza a escucharZugzwang Se le empieza a escucharZugzwang Se le empieza a escuchar
    • Ver Perfil
Re: Tema: PPCC - Pisitófilos Creditófagos - Primavera 2023
« Respuesta #281 en: Marzo 27, 2023, 12:03:40 pm »
https://techcrunch.com/2023/03/26/tech-company-layoffs-2023-morale/

Citar
The layoffs will continue until (investor) morale improves

[...]

An argument could be made, of course, that these companies overhired during the recent tech boom, and now it’s time to right size to better fit a changing market. That argument would carry more weight if the companies in question weren’t profitable. However, large American tech companies are very often both profitable and incredibly wealthy, even if their market cap has fallen from record highs.

While there is some truth to the idea that companies grew too quickly in recent years and need to reset, layoffs feel like the worst kind of short-term thinking: sacrificing employees to please investors. Are companies at least getting what they want from investors out of this devil’s bargain?
[/color]

Si se confirma, esto es un puro y simple suicidio. Ahora que el invierno demográfico golpea, y ni se contempla la opción de externalizar -era la bomba hace 20 años y acabó en un fiasco monumental-, ¿de dónde piensan sacar más mano de obra?

Que recen para que les alcance con la que les ha quedado, porque como los proyectos se resientan, estas empresas lo van a pasar mal.

Siguiendo la lógica de 2008, es simplemente supervivencia. Y determinadas acciones (como lo es despedir trabajadores) puede ser un suicidio a medio plazo, pero de lo que se trata hoy es de supervivencia. Han estado tanto tiempo adaptando su modelo de negocio a la situación de tipos cero o negativos, de vender humo de diferentes colores buscando el crecimiento rápido inmediato (metaversos, plataformas de streaming tipo Netflix, realidad virtual, etc), sabiendo que se podía contratar tanto como se quisiera, que han renunciado a un modelo de negocio anclado a beneficios reales y sostenidos en el tiempo, y con la subida de tipos, su modelo de negocio está desnudo. Están amputando todo lo que pueden para reducir costes (como en su día se hizo con la construcción, porque no había negocio pero tienes una empresa con accionistas que exigen rentabilidad, unos compromisos de pago de cualquier índole, directivos, y muchísimos trabajadores con nóminas todos los meses, y  su razonamiento es que cuando volvamos a la normalidad, ya contrataremos otra vez) porque el objetivo es sobrevivir.

En definitiva, a los trabajadores de las tecnológicas (salvando las distancias) les puede estar pasando lo mismo que a los trabajadores de la construcción en 2008 (aplíquese también a la banca). Ante la falta de negocio rentable y con un modelo de negocio que ha crecido al albor del crédito barato, ahora se va a la desesperada para reducir cualquier gasto y poder seguir existiendo, y me da a mi que en esta amputación (como también pasó en la construcción) muchos se van a pasar, si pueden, a otros sectores y en poco más de cinco años (si no antes) se dirá por activa y por pasiva que faltan profesionales para el sector tecnológico, analistas, programadores, diseñadores, científicos de datos, porque la IA le va a pasar como a los robots que ponen ladrillos, una cosa es lo que la tecnología puede hacer, y otra lo que se necesita en cualquier lugar y en cualquier momento, y ahí se necesita alguien (y no algo) con la capacidad de desconectarse del pensamiento abstracto para saber lo que le pide su jefe o cualquier cliente. La IA no es un sustituto de trabajadores, sino una herramienta que puede ser más cara o más barata que un trabajador, según el modelo de negocio, el alcance y el valor añadido. La recontratación se va a producir, y me da a mí que pasará como con la construcción: de ferrallas y enconfradores a 3000 mensuales nada de nada, poco más que mileuristas y gracias, que en la calle no hay trabajo. Mi impresión es que el plan maestro es sustituir mano de obra cualificada, con años de experiencia y sueldos altos por chavales con cursos intensivos de seis o doce meses en una BootCamp Full Stack Developer a razón de mil euros (o dólares) mensuales, a tiempo parcial y mediante subcontratación, aprovechándose de que la tecnología es cada vez más fácil de usar y que "para picar código no hace falta una ingeniería, solamente actitud, resiliencia y la formación adecuada". Y pienso como tú: va a salir rematadamente mal. 

Aquí habrá llantos y el "sector" pedirá de forma recurrente 700.000 profesionales ante una demanda creciente de perfiles que nadie quiere desempeñar (a pesar del elevado desempleo y de que la formación se ofrece de forma gratuita). Luego ves cómo avanzan los chinos y te llevas las manos a la cabeza; como varias veces apunta Manu Oquendo, solamente hay que ver las patentes registradas en los últimos años. Hace falta un cambio de rumbo total, no solamente en relación al banano.   

Benzino Napaloni

  • Estructuralista
  • ****
  • Gracias
  • -Dadas: 875
  • -Recibidas: 16297
  • Mensajes: 1937
  • Nivel: 184
  • Benzino Napaloni Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Benzino Napaloni Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Benzino Napaloni Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Benzino Napaloni Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Benzino Napaloni Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Benzino Napaloni Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Benzino Napaloni Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Benzino Napaloni Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Benzino Napaloni Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Benzino Napaloni Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Benzino Napaloni Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.Benzino Napaloni Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.
    • Ver Perfil
Re: Tema: PPCC - Pisitófilos Creditófagos - Primavera 2023
« Respuesta #282 en: Marzo 27, 2023, 12:34:15 pm »
Contesto por partes, que es un post interesante con mucha chicha.

Siguiendo la lógica de 2008, es simplemente supervivencia. Y determinadas acciones (como lo es despedir trabajadores) puede ser un suicidio a medio plazo, pero de lo que se trata hoy es de supervivencia. Han estado tanto tiempo adaptando su modelo de negocio a la situación de tipos cero o negativos, de vender humo de diferentes colores buscando el crecimiento rápido inmediato (metaversos, plataformas de streaming tipo Netflix, realidad virtual, etc), sabiendo que se podía contratar tanto como se quisiera, que han renunciado a un modelo de negocio anclado a beneficios reales y sostenidos en el tiempo, y con la subida de tipos, su modelo de negocio está desnudo. Están amputando todo lo que pueden para reducir costes (como en su día se hizo con la construcción, porque no había negocio pero tienes una empresa con accionistas que exigen rentabilidad, unos compromisos de pago de cualquier índole, directivos, y muchísimos trabajadores con nóminas todos los meses, y  su razonamiento es que cuando volvamos a la normalidad, ya contrataremos otra vez) porque el objetivo es sobrevivir.

No olvidemos una constante que se viene dando desde los 80 en EEUU, y con cierto retraso en España también: ha habido otros tipos de interés encubiertos a cero que era la pirámide demográfica. Los nacidos en los 70 y los 80 eran demasiados para lo que podía absorber el mercado laboral. Buena parte del tejido empresarial está montado sobre la premisa de poder rotar fácilmente la plantilla. General Electric fue una de las que impuso la política del miedo: felicitar al 20% mejor de los empleados -obviando la discusión de los criterios-, reñir al 70%, y despedir al 10% peor puntuado.

Una de las razones de por qué esta ola de despidos será catastrófica es porque se sigue implementando esta política cuando ya no hay población suficiente para mantener esa tasa de recambio.


En definitiva, a los trabajadores de las tecnológicas (salvando las distancias) les puede estar pasando lo mismo que a los trabajadores de la construcción en 2008 (aplíquese también a la banca).

No exactamente. Los trabajadores de la construcción se fueron mayormente al paro, y no pocos inmigrantes tuvieron que volver a sus países. En la banca la situación fue más compleja, se descartó sobre todo a los trabajadores más caros pero poco después tuvieron que repescar a muchos que sabían cómo gestionar impagos. Esto recuerda a Twitter, la primera poda de Musk incluyó despedidos por error porque eran necesarios para lo que se quería implementar.

En el caso de los trabajadores de las tecnológicas, los perfiles no técnicos o sin experiencia lo van a tener algo peor. Pero los técnicos ya se están recolocando con mucha rapidez. Fuera de las empresas "molonas" hay muchísimo trabajo. Puede que ahí no tengan oficinas con muebles de maderita o puffs para sentarse, pero no les faltará dinero para pagar las facturas.


Ante la falta de negocio rentable y con un modelo de negocio que ha crecido al albor del crédito barato, ahora se va a la desesperada para reducir cualquier gasto y poder seguir existiendo, y me da a mi que en esta amputación (como también pasó en la construcción) muchos se van a pasar, si pueden, a otros sectores y en poco más de cinco años (si no antes) se dirá por activa y por pasiva que faltan profesionales para el sector tecnológico, analistas, programadores, diseñadores, científicos de datos, porque la IA le va a pasar como a los robots que ponen ladrillos, una cosa es lo que la tecnología puede hacer, y otra lo que se necesita en cualquier lugar y en cualquier momento, y ahí se necesita alguien (y no algo) con la capacidad de desconectarse del pensamiento abstracto para saber lo que le pide su jefe o cualquier cliente. La IA no es un sustituto de trabajadores, sino una herramienta que puede ser más cara o más barata que un trabajador, según el modelo de negocio, el alcance y el valor añadido. La recontratación se va a producir, y me da a mí que pasará como con la construcción: de ferrallas y enconfradores a 3000 mensuales nada de nada, poco más que mileuristas y gracias, que en la calle no hay trabajo. Mi impresión es que el plan maestro es sustituir mano de obra cualificada, con años de experiencia y sueldos altos por chavales con cursos intensivos de seis o doce meses en una BootCamp Full Stack Developer a razón de mil euros (o dólares) mensuales, a tiempo parcial y mediante subcontratación, aprovechándose de que la tecnología es cada vez más fácil de usar y que "para picar código no hace falta una ingeniería, solamente actitud, resiliencia y la formación adecuada". Y pienso como tú: va a salir rematadamente mal.

Comento una anécdota de estas academias. Hace algún tiempo una me quiso incorporar como profesor online. Por curiosidad tiré del hilo, y sólo cuando me pusieron el contrato por delante encontré la trampa. No sólo el pago era bruto -aún quedaba algo potable-, el material didáctico no sólo no existía sino que pretendían que lo hiciese yo y quedárselo ellos en propiedad.

Ante semejante disparate les mandé (amablemente) a la porra. No sólo no salía a cuenta, sino que era un descaro. Así es como pretenden hacerse con el know-how que les falta.


Aquí habrá llantos y el "sector" pedirá de forma recurrente 700.000 profesionales ante una demanda creciente de perfiles que nadie quiere desempeñar (a pesar del elevado desempleo y de que la formación se ofrece de forma gratuita). Luego ves cómo avanzan los chinos y te llevas las manos a la cabeza; como varias veces apunta Manu Oquendo, solamente hay que ver las patentes registradas en los últimos años. Hace falta un cambio de rumbo total, no solamente en relación al banano.

La construcción denuncia un «problema de Estado» por la falta de 700.000 trabajadores :roto2:

El golpe en la construcción en 2008 fue tremendo, fueron años de pasarlas muy canutas. Hará falta mucho tiempo para que se olvide eso, con razón los posibles trabajadores se lo piensan dos veces antes de meterse.

En el momento en que las empresas demuestran que son despiadadas, fuerzan al trabajador a convertirse en un mercenario. Hasta hace relativamente pocos años no era fácil de hacer por el desequilibrio entre oferta y demanda de empleo. Pero eso ya estaba cambiando antes de la pandemia, y ahora se está haciendo más evidente.
 



Resumiendo, éste es el menú del día:
  • No hay trabajadores suficientes para el nivel de rotación que se plantea.
  • No hay externalización posible. En los 2000 ya se probó y acabó como un fiasco absoluto.
  • La IA que sustituya la falta de trabajadores, ni está ni se la espera.
  • Los despidos en masa están quebrando -aún más- la fe en las empresas, los trabajadores se volverán aún más mercenarios de lo que ya lo eran. En pandemia ya se vio esto, ya hubo despidos en masa y luego las empresas no pudieron recuperar toda la mano de obra perdida.

Probando recetas neoliberales cuando ya no hay población suficiente. ¿Qué podría salir mal?

Cuando intenten recuperar los trabajadores perdidos empezarán los sudores fríos.

saturno

  • Sabe de economía
  • *****
  • Gracias
  • -Dadas: 88041
  • -Recibidas: 30828
  • Mensajes: 8419
  • Nivel: 848
  • saturno Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.saturno Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.saturno Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.saturno Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.saturno Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.saturno Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.saturno Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.saturno Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.saturno Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.saturno Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.saturno Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.saturno Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.
    • Ver Perfil
    • Billets philo-phynanciers crédit-consumméristes
Re: Tema: PPCC - Pisitófilos Creditófagos - Primavera 2023
« Respuesta #283 en: Marzo 27, 2023, 12:40:40 pm »
[El capitalismo ha FRACASADO en la provisión de vivienda. Pero los atentados no los perpetran los capitalistas, sino los capitalistitas. No basta con LAMENTAR, hay que CONDENAR.]

Hay algo que se me escapa.

El capitaliismo solo puede funcionar con bienes "muebles" (mudables), es decir bienes cuya transaccion supone cambiar de lugar espacial, hasta el punto que donde mejor funciona es con aquellos bienes que siguen siéndolo aunque no lleven aparejado un título. Se intercambian bienes y servicios, no títulos de propiedad. y ni siquiera los títulos financieros son la excepción, detrás hay "valores" (y son mutables, en lugar de mudables)

La vivienda es por excelencia un bien "inmueble", cuyo objeto de transaccion excluye llana y simplemente el bien fisico  y lo que es objeto de intercambio es el título (en derecho "la cosa real", se refiere en la práctica al tïtulo de propiedad, incluso la nuda propiedad). Lo que determina la transaccion es el título. Y el valor del título es en este caso "politico" (asunto de gentes, ley de la 'Ciudad' en etimología antigua). Por extensión, va aparejado al modelo politico de Estado (ciudad, feudo, burgo=lugar donde se encuentra el mercado de bienes producidos o traidos del exterior),

Significa primero que el capitalismo no puede tener como objeto la vivienda, porque ésta se sale de su ámbito funcional.

Segundo, que el pop-capitalismo ha pretendido integrar los títulos de inmuebles dentro de una lógica de bienes muebles. Lo cual desemboca en conflictos y en contradicciones insalvables. Básicamente consiste en argumentar que el valor  mercantil del usufructo (derecho de uso) determina el valor politico de la nuda propiedad (de la cosa real)

Pero el capitalismo no puede haber fracasado con la vivienda porque es indiferente a su modus operandi: los bienes reales inmuebles no tienen otra existencia que política, mientras que los bienes de intercambio (muebles)  son producidos por el Trabajo,  Por su naturaleza, el Trabajo, ni siquiera la Empresa capitalista no tiene, ni puede tener, incidencia sobre el valor mercantil de los bienes-reales-inmuebles, y sólo de forma accidental sobre el valor del usufructo (un bien inmueble es un monopolio espacial forzoso), actuando por tanto como un impuesto privado.

Decir que el capitalismo ha fracasado con la vivienda es contradictorio, o como poco, muy confuso.

La afirmación es equivocada, no tiene contenido, salvo que lo que se quiera decir es esto;
"el capitalismo popular ha fracasado con la vivienda"


¡Pues claro que el popCapitalismo ha fracasado! Demonios, es lo que lleva enseñando desde hace décadas y todos los que vivimos en tiempos de desvarío PopCapitalista sabemos que el diagnóstico es correcto, No sólo por conocimiento, basta con haberlo padecido en nuestra trayectoria vital,

Y tercero, una vez formulado el diagnóstico, de lo que se trata es de dar con el tratamiento aplicable,

Yo digo que la primera leccion est comprender que carecemos de un aparato conceptual funcional.
No basta con observar la correlación entre el desarrollo del Capital y el desarrollo del Estado.

Es necesario razonar la relación.

La relacion puede ser sustancial (piensen en ciencias naturales) -- Con ese aparato conceptual, en el sXIX, se afirmó la identidad Capital-Estado (lo que devino el modelo burgués).

La relaciön puede ser causal (piensen en ciencias mecánicas, la física) -- Con ese aparato conceptual, en el sXX, se afirmó que el Capital era causa del Estado (lo que alumbró el modelo del capitalismo popular). Así es como se fabricaron LEYES politicas para tratar los títulos de inmuebles como bienes muebles; de forma que los primeros se convirtieron en "activos". Por ilustrar, piensen que la ley de copropiedad inmobiliaria remonta a los años 1965. Antes de éstas, a lo sumo se razonaba la nuda-propiedad real e infinitas variantes de usufructo. La copropiedad horizontal hizo posible el convertir la propiedad inmobiliaria en un "activo".

Pero también hay una tercera relación -- que es la relación de "comunidad", que no está para nada investigada como debiera, pero que veremos probablemente ahora empezar a caminar. Basicamente, viene a tratarse de una relación donde lo que llamamos la realidad no se determina dentro de una consecución temporal (como ocurre con la relación causal), pero tampoco se determina intrínsecamente  (como ocurre con la relación sustancial). Básicamente, sabes que estás ante una relación de comunidad cuando un efecto real acontece sin posibilidad de remontar a una causa antecesora y tampoco nace o se genera de forma intrinseca a partir de ninguna de las sustancias aislables que integran dicha comunidad. Hasta ahora, la relación de comunidad se conoce y utiliza sobre todo en Derecho, por ejemplo con lo que se denomina una "maquinación" donde dados 3 agentes A, B y C forman una relación de  comunidad. El agente A pone el título, el agente B pone el dinero, y el agente C adquiere el título al agente A comprometIéndose a devolver el dinero al agente B.

La relación de comunidad económica no debe confundirse con la relación substancial (modelo burgués, economia de bienes de consumo) o causal (modelo popCapitalista, economía de activos cotizados). Pero aún queda pensarla y desarrollar su aparato conceptual. Eso es a lo que estamos asistiendo ya en economía en el comportamiento de los BBCC, con el desarrollo de la ciencias "estocásticas". Intuyan, pero no busquen modelos preexistentes, porque el modelo coherente está por crear, por cantar, y pòr fabricar.

Por ejemplo, intuyo que el desarrollo de las tecnologías de la información, y ahora  la IA operan a fondo dentro de las relación de comunidad. Y por eso tienen una transcendencia que no medimos aún.

Después de la máquina herramienta (tecnología de la relación causal)  que dio lugar a la Revolución industrial, nos vamos a dotar de máquinas con tecnología de relación comunal (literalmente, de "maquinacion").

Y vamos a alumbrar una RevolucIön divertida. Pero lo que toca es dotarnos de un aparato conceptual capaz de superar el aparato sustancial o causal que solemos utilizar.


Saludos

Edit 1; editada la frase acerca de cuándo identificas una relación de comunidad
Edit 2: editado el vocablo -"real" para limitarlo al sentido de "cosa real" (el tïtulo de la nuda propiedad) inmueble,
Edit 3: reeditado
#MIND 230327

« última modificación: Marzo 27, 2023, 22:16:01 pm por saturno »
Alegraos, la transición estructural, por divertida, es revolucionaria.

PPCC v/eshttp://ppcc-es.blogspot

sudden and sharp

  • Administrator
  • Sabe de economía
  • *****
  • Gracias
  • -Dadas: 50299
  • -Recibidas: 59928
  • Mensajes: 9914
  • Nivel: 984
  • sudden and sharp Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.sudden and sharp Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.sudden and sharp Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.sudden and sharp Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.sudden and sharp Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.sudden and sharp Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.sudden and sharp Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.sudden and sharp Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.sudden and sharp Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.sudden and sharp Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.sudden and sharp Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.sudden and sharp Sus opiniones inspiran a los demás.
    • Ver Perfil
Re: Tema: PPCC - Pisitófilos Creditófagos - Primavera 2023
« Respuesta #284 en: Marzo 27, 2023, 12:43:05 pm »
El libro de Tamames sobre la moción es el más vendido de política en Amazon  :roto2:
https://www.elperiodico.com/es/politica/20230327/libro-tamames-amazon-vendido-politica-mocion-censura-vox-85230481
El candidato a relevar a Sánchez en Moncloa ha puesto a la venda el discurso que pronunció como postulante de Vox







 :)

Tags: De todo un poco 
 


SimplePortal 2.3.3 © 2008-2010, SimplePortal